Current Affairs Book Reviews

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"Serious readers will delight in these pages."
An unusually rewarding meditation on how a wild mushroom can help us see the world's ruined condition after the advent of modern capitalism. Read full book review >
BLUE by Joe Domanick
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Sprawling, engrossing, and highly relevant to the ongoing controversies about policing post-Ferguson, which Domanick addresses in an epilogue."
An incisive examination of American policing, using a tumultuous two decades in Los Angeles as a lens. Read full book review >

EMPIRE OF FEAR by Andrew Hosken
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A tremendously useful, insightful study of the frightening spread of a culture of death."
An exploration of the spreading terror of the self-proclaimed new caliphate. Read full book review >
WHAT PHILOSOPHY CAN DO by Gary Gutting
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Somewhat less supple than Simon Blackburn's Think (1999) as a general introduction to philosophy but an excellent, readable, and eminently practical guide."
It can't take you to the airport, but philosophy, as this spirited book argues, can do all sorts of great things—including contribute to our happiness. Read full book review >
CHARLIE MIKE by Joe Klein
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"The compelling story of a continuing mission, rendered with sympathy and verisimilitude."
A savvy political observer presents his report on some veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan after they return home. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"Filled with the intrigue and high stakes of a spy novel, Jacobsen's history of DARPA is as much a fascinating testament to human ingenuity as it is a paean to endless industrial warfare and the bureaucracy of the military-industrial complex."
The history of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the military's top-secret research and development agency. Read full book review >
A MIGHTY PURPOSE by Adam Fifield
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"This fine, engrossing portrait reveals Grant's unstoppable passion and remarkable achievements."
A biographical commemoration of a powerful champion of children's health. Read full book review >
SURPRISE ATTACK by Larry Hancock
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"A timely, pertinent study emphasizing the fact that when it comes to military or terrorist attacks, 'there are always warnings.'"
A valuable examination of U.S. national security crises past and present. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Useful for anyone with a horse in the race regarding law enforcement—in other words, most American citizens."
A handbook for making sense of America's approach to crime and incarceration and its effect on communities across the country. Read full book review >
FIND ME UNAFRAID by Kennedy Odede
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A well-wrought, inspiring tale of 'change and justice' in a part of the world where they are often sorely lacking."
An impassioned tale of how an unusual Kenyan NGO became globally galvanized by the romance between its embattled Nairobi director and a resolute young Wesleyan University student. Read full book review >
NEW OLD WORLD by Pallavi Aiyar
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Fresh insight into how Europeans might learn valuable lessons from developing countries."
A longing for harmony and an embrace of multiculturalism mark this foreign correspondent's examination of the European situation as seen from Brussels. Read full book review >
NEGROLAND by Margo Jefferson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Jefferson swings the narrative back and forth through her life, exploring the tides of racism, opportunity, and dignity while also provocatively exploring the inherent contradictions for Jefferson and her family members in working so tirelessly to differentiate themselves."
From a Pulitzer Prize-winning theater and book critic, a memoir about being raised in upper-class black Chicago, where families worked tirelessly to distance themselves as much from lower-class black people as from white people. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Beatriz Williams
June 23, 2015

In Beatriz Williams’ latest novel Tiny Little Thing, it’s the summer of 1966 and Christina Hardcastle—“Tiny” to her illustrious family—stands on the brink of a breathtaking future. Of the three Schuyler sisters, she’s the one raised to marry a man destined for leadership, and with her elegance and impeccable style, she presents a perfect camera-ready image in the dawning age of television politics. Together she and her husband, Frank, make the ultimate power couple: intelligent, rich, and impossibly attractive. It seems nothing can stop Frank from rising to national office, and he’s got his sights set on a senate seat in November. But as the season gets underway at the family estate on Cape Cod, three unwelcome visitors appear in Tiny’s perfect life. “A fascinating look at wealth, love, ambition, secrets, and what family members will and won’t do to protect each other,” our reviewer writes. View video >