Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 2)

TEETH by Mary Otto
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A focused, well-researched depiction of the dental industry's social and cultural relevance and its dire need for reform."
An astute examination of the complex, insular business of oral health care. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"The book will have some appeal for certain sectors of the sociology community, but it is likely too narrowly focused to reach a wider audience."
New York-born, Toronto-based writer Bovy debuts with an exploration of how the idea of "privilege" has morphed over the years and now "plays an enormous role in the online shaming culture." Read full book review >

BEYOND $15 by Jonathan Rosenblum
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"An inspiring model for coalition-building."
A veteran (30-plus years) labor organizer tells the story of the Seattle-Tacoma area's successful $15-per-hour minimum wage campaign and looks forward to a future revival of the labor movement. Read full book review >
ANATOMY OF INNOCENCE by Laura Caldwell
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A searing, unforgettable anthology, with valuable insights provided at the end of each chapter by the editors."
A unique collection of 15 wrongful conviction sagas bound to shake faith in the American criminal justice system. Read full book review >
HOW TO KILL A CITY by Peter Moskowitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A harsh critic of the forces changing urban life paints a vivid and grim picture of the future of American cities."
A freelance journalist reveals the many evils of gentrification. Read full book review >

NO FRIENDS BUT THE MOUNTAINS by Judith Matloff
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"A tightly focused study of mountain societies that hints at future conflicts."
A veteran journalist drops into the highest hotspots across the globe for a sobering account of why mountainous regions often engender violence. Read full book review >
WISH LANTERNS by Alec Ash
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Sensitive, fascinating reports."
Novelistic anecdotes reveal Chinese young people struggling with universal themes of education, employment, and love. Read full book review >
INFERNO by Steven Hatch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Despite occasional long-windedness, Hatch's analysis is intelligent, nuanced, and tempered, a necessary departure from the panicked response of most American media outlets."
An American doctor describes his experiences in Liberia during the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic. Read full book review >
A GENERATION OF SOCIOPATHS by Bruce Cannon Gibney
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"'This is a deeply negative portrayal, but a certain negativity may be what's required.' Maybe so, but if this polemic makes wounded millennials feel better, it likely won't reach older ears, who may be more sympathetic than Gibney imagines."
A cri de coeur against baby boomers, who "unraveled the social fabric woven by previous generations in the interests of sheer selfishness." Read full book review >
THE END OF EUROPE by James Kirchick
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"Students of geopolitics and current affairs would do well to spend time with this book, which, though deceptively slender, contains multitudes."
A journey across the ideological and literal battlegrounds of the Old World, featuring reports full of dire portent. Read full book review >
THE DEATH AND LIFE OF THE GREAT LAKES by Dan Egan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"Not light reading but essential for policymakers—and highly recommended for the 40 million people who rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water."
An alarming account of the "slow-motion catastrophe" facing the world's largest freshwater system. Read full book review >
THE OPTIMISTIC LEFTIST by Ruy Teixeira
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A useful political book that makes it hard to understand how Donald Trump could have possibly won the election."
A political analyst offers American liberals a host of reasons to be cheerful. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >