Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 2)

AGE OF ANGER by Pankaj Mishra
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A probing, well-informed investigation of global unrest calling for 'truly transformative thinking' about humanity's future."
How the failures of capitalism have led to "fear, confusion, loneliness and loss"—and global anger. Read full book review >
STAND YOUR GROUND by Caroline E. Light
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A weighty consideration of the cultural politics behind disturbing flash points like the death of Trayvon Martin."
A legalistic polemic arguing that the "natural right" of self-defense has been perverted by American gun culture. Read full book review >

GLASS HOUSE by Brian Alexander
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A devastating and illuminating book that shows how a city and a country got where they are and how difficult it can be to reverse course."
A journalist examines how corporate America and the politics enabling it have corroded an Ohio city to its very foundation. Read full book review >
HOW MAY I HELP YOU? by Deepak Singh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An interesting look at a puzzling society—ours—from the point of view of a sympathetic but not uncritical outsider. Good reading for students of comparative cultures."
An immigrant's thoughtful account of what it means to make a new life in a strange land, in this case the South. Read full book review >
WHISTLEBLOWER AT THE CIA by Melvin A. Goodman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 15, 2017

"The causes of Goodman's vitriol are indeed worrisome, but his countless repetitions grow wearisome."
A former CIA analyst (1966-1990) deplores what he argues is the increasing deleterious politicization of the agency. Read full book review >

UNWARRANTED by Barry Friedman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"At once creative and conservative, Friedman offers a timely blueprint for recovering democratic control of local and national law enforcement."
A law professor diagnoses the ills of American policing and prescribes a healthy dose of sunlight. Read full book review >
WHY I AM NOT A FEMINIST by Jessa Crispin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Forget busting glass ceilings. Crispin has taken a wrecking ball to the whole structure."
A taut and spirited attack on contemporary mainstream feminism. Read full book review >
CAPTURED by Sheldon Whitehouse
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"The book reads more like a Democrat's attack on Republicans, but many of the ills it illuminates are bipartisan."
A United States senator argues that "there is virtually no element of the political landscape into which corporate influence has not intruded." Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A jargon-heavy, superficial primer on altered states tuned to a specific audience."
Two researchers survey the various ways that human beings alter their consciousness to improve performance. Read full book review >
FAST-FOOD KIDS by Amy L. Best
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"The book may be useful for sociology teachers and students, but general readers and policymakers will find this tough to digest."
A cultural analysis of what kids eat and why. Read full book review >
THE COMPLACENT CLASS by Tyler Cowen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"A book that will undoubtedly stir discussion—as many of Cowen's books do—with readers divided about how they stand based on where they currently sit."
An influential economist seeks to persuade readers that American citizens have gotten overly complacent, that a crisis point is near, and that a widespread rebellion may alter the existing order. Read full book review >
THE HOME THAT WAS OUR COUNTRY by Alia Malek
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Provocative, richly detailed reading."
A Syrian-American journalist/civil rights lawyer interweaves narratives about her family with the history of modern Syria. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >