Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 2)

HOW TO KILL A CITY by Peter Moskowitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A harsh critic of the forces changing urban life paints a vivid and grim picture of the future of American cities."
A freelance journalist reveals the many evils of gentrification. Read full book review >
NO FRIENDS BUT THE MOUNTAINS by Judith Matloff
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"A tightly focused study of mountain societies that hints at future conflicts."
A veteran journalist drops into the highest hotspots across the globe for a sobering account of why mountainous regions often engender violence. Read full book review >

ANATOMY OF INNOCENCE by Laura Caldwell
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A searing, unforgettable anthology, with valuable insights provided at the end of each chapter by the editors."
A unique collection of 15 wrongful conviction sagas bound to shake faith in the American criminal justice system. Read full book review >
THE OPTIMISTIC LEFTIST by Ruy Teixeira
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"A useful political book that makes it hard to understand how Donald Trump could have possibly won the election."
A political analyst offers American liberals a host of reasons to be cheerful. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"Though replete with engaging vignettes, Erzen's work is too narrowly focused and unrevealing."
Erzen (Religion and Gender Studies/Univ. of Puget Sound; Fanpire: The Twilight Saga and the Women Who Love It, 2012, etc.) examines the rise of ministries in some of America's largest prison systems, critiquing their motives and effectiveness. Read full book review >

WISH LANTERNS by Alec Ash
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Sensitive, fascinating reports."
Novelistic anecdotes reveal Chinese young people struggling with universal themes of education, employment, and love. Read full book review >
THE END OF EUROPE by James Kirchick
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"Students of geopolitics and current affairs would do well to spend time with this book, which, though deceptively slender, contains multitudes."
A journey across the ideological and literal battlegrounds of the Old World, featuring reports full of dire portent. Read full book review >
HOW THE HELL DID THIS HAPPEN? by P.J. O’Rourke
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 7, 2017

"It's not Hunter S. Thompson, and O'Rourke has been funnier, lots funnier—but then again, it may just be that our current political situation is no laughing matter."
Tossed-off bons mots on "this obnoxious political spectacle, the election of 2016." Read full book review >
WE DO OUR PART by Charles Peters
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"A cogent and meaningful call for citizens to share the benefits and burdens of a unified society—hopefully an argument that isn't already past its sell-by date."
A legendary journalist offers a plea for national civility and unity rooted in the ethos of the New Deal. Read full book review >
EVERYTHING UNDER THE HEAVENS by Howard W. French
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A lucid if stolid overview of regional history, useful for students of Pacific affairs in playing out scenarios of what might happen next."
A long-view look at events that are making China's neighbors—and much of the world beyond—very nervous indeed. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"The book will have some appeal for certain sectors of the sociology community, but it is likely too narrowly focused to reach a wider audience."
New York-born, Toronto-based writer Bovy debuts with an exploration of how the idea of "privilege" has morphed over the years and now "plays an enormous role in the online shaming culture." Read full book review >
TEETH by Mary Otto
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A focused, well-researched depiction of the dental industry's social and cultural relevance and its dire need for reform."
An astute examination of the complex, insular business of oral health care. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >