Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 2)

DOWN AND OUT IN THE NEW ECONOMY by Ilana Gershon
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 10, 2017

"An intermittently useful book that could have been a long-form magazine feature."
An anthropologist explores the hiring practices of employers in a digital era. Read full book review >
AN AMERICAN SICKNESS by Elisabeth Rosenthal
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 11, 2017

"A scathing denouncement, stronger in portraying the system's problems than in offering pragmatic solutions."
A blast across the bow of the entire health care industry, which "attends more or less single-mindedly to its own profits." Read full book review >

STOLEN GIRLS by Wolfgang Bauer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 11, 2017

"Not a pleasant read but a vitally important one."
A veteran German journalist documents the stories of female survivors of Islamic terrorist group Boko Haram in their own words and in pictures. Read full book review >
THE GIVERS by David Callahan
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 11, 2017

"An eye-opening view of a vast sector of the economy that lies in the shadows but has undue influence, for ill or good."
Intriguing look at the world of big-ticket philanthropy, which shows promise of surpassing much governmental social-service spending in the near future. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 11, 2017

"A sobering account of inequality and spatial conflict rising against a cultural backdrop of urban change."
A prominent urban theorist examines the hidden impacts of gentrification and innovation on (mostly) American cities. Read full book review >

A $500 HOUSE IN DETROIT by Drew Philp
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 11, 2017

"A standout in the Detroit rehab genre."
A young man finds joy in a "place they said no one could love." Read full book review >
A LAND WITHOUT BORDERS by Nir Baram
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 11, 2017

"From horror to fatigue to indifference, an important look forward and back that provides a grass-roots sense that one state needs to satisfy sovereignty for all."
An honest and troubling snapshot of Israel—both Palestinian and Israeli—that reveals the creeping realization that a two-state solution may no longer be possible. Read full book review >
WHERE THE WATER GOES by David Owen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 11, 2017

"As Owen amply proves, 'water issues are never only about water.'"
Travels along the endangered Colorado River and its tributaries reveal the challenges of providing water to 36 million people throughout the West. Read full book review >
WELCOME TO YOUR WORLD by Sarah Williams Goldhagen
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 11, 2017

"An eye-opening look at the ways in which carefully planned and executed design and architecture can expand cognitive faculties and improve daily life."
A look at how new research in urban space, the built environment, and city planning stresses the importance of well-designed architecture for the betterment of society. Read full book review >
THE HEALTH OF NATIONS by Karen Bartlett
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 11, 2017

"Bartlett makes it abundantly clear that research to reduce the impact of infectious disease is progressing but that politics, budgetary constraints, competing priorities, and ego clashes are serious impediments."
Will the world ever be rid of infectious disease? Read full book review >
NOT A SCIENTIST by Dave Levitan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 18, 2017

"A no-holds-barred takedown of political idiocy and the terrifying reality of science denial."
A look at how trends in political rhetoric are used to undermine scientific evidence. Read full book review >
THE SEASONS ALTER by Philip Kitcher
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 18, 2017

"The result is a superbly rational, entirely futile exchange of ideas. 'Fruitful discussion' did little to resolve slavery or segregation, and it's largely absent from America's debate on global warming."
A philosophical exploration of climate change. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >