Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 3)

EVERYTHING UNDER THE HEAVENS by Howard W. French
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A lucid if stolid overview of regional history, useful for students of Pacific affairs in playing out scenarios of what might happen next."
A long-view look at events that are making China's neighbors—and much of the world beyond—very nervous indeed. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"The book will have some appeal for certain sectors of the sociology community, but it is likely too narrowly focused to reach a wider audience."
New York-born, Toronto-based writer Bovy debuts with an exploration of how the idea of "privilege" has morphed over the years and now "plays an enormous role in the online shaming culture." Read full book review >

TEETH by Mary Otto
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A focused, well-researched depiction of the dental industry's social and cultural relevance and its dire need for reform."
An astute examination of the complex, insular business of oral health care. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A strong case that deserves a wider readership than just policy wonks."
An examination of economic inequality—unsurprisingly, the title refers to race as well as economic class. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"Full of object lessons, this is a valuable overview for students of international commerce."
There are new markets to share out there, and the old capitalist way of doing things won't be the one that captures them. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 14, 2017

"An alarming account but one suggesting that, armed with knowledge, we can reverse this way of treating the plants that feed us and find a way toward a more sustainable diet."
A convincing argument that the agricultural revolution that has made food more readily available around the world contains the seeds of its own destruction. Read full book review >
BEYOND $15 by Jonathan Rosenblum
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"An inspiring model for coalition-building."
A veteran (30-plus years) labor organizer tells the story of the Seattle-Tacoma area's successful $15-per-hour minimum wage campaign and looks forward to a future revival of the labor movement. Read full book review >
UTOPIA FOR REALISTS by Rutger Bregman
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"Raise the minimum wage? No. Give everyone a basic income, smash the machines, and work a couple of days per week—that's the ticket. A provocative pleasure to contemplate."
A spirited and practical manifesto for improving the odds of making a heaven on Earth. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 16, 2017

"A blend of accessible economic theory and practical reform, of much interest to any reader whose common cause is with the 99 rather than the 1 percent."
The declining middle class represents not just a lost economic stratum, but the disappeared basis for the quaint idea of representative democracy. Read full book review >
SEASTEADING by Joe Quirk
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 2017

"While the authors' enthusiasm should be taken with more than a grain of salt, they raise ideas worth considering and offer hope for a future when life on land has grown grim."
The founder and communications director of the Seasteading Institute make a case that the survival of the planet depends on moving out from the land onto the sea. Read full book review >
SENSEMAKING by Christian Madsbjerg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 2017

"The author employs jargon, to be sure, but he explains each piece of jargon with admirable clarity."
A business consultant argues for the importance of learning through human interactions rather than always emphasizing computer-generated data. Read full book review >
A COLONY IN A NATION by Chris Hayes
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 21, 2017

"A timely and impassioned argument for social justice."
Profound contrasts in policing and incarceration reveal disparate Americas. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 14, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >