Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 3)

THE SEASONS ALTER by Philip Kitcher
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 18, 2017

"The result is a superbly rational, entirely futile exchange of ideas. 'Fruitful discussion' did little to resolve slavery or segregation, and it's largely absent from America's debate on global warming."
A philosophical exploration of climate change. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 18, 2017

"A powerful argument for reducing inequality and revolutionizing how we use the Web for the benefit of the many rather than the few."
When American representative democracy collapses, blame it on Facebook. Read full book review >

DRAWDOWN by Paul Hawken
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 18, 2017

"An optimistic program for getting out of our current mess, well deserving of the broadest possible readership."
Be kindly unto the scientists, for they may just save our skin—and make us happier and wealthier in the bargain. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 18, 2017

"It's not Fear and Loathing or even The Boys on the Bus, but Conroy turns in a quirky, well-observed account of how electoral politics works."
To win the presidency, you have to win a primary, and to win a primary, you have to carry New Hampshire, powerful all out of proportion to its size or population. Read full book review >
CLIMATE OF HOPE by Michael Bloomberg
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 18, 2017

"Whether this is an exercise in thinking globally and acting locally or vice versa, a thoughtful, eminently reasonable set of proposals for saving New York—and therefore the world."
Just in time for Earth Day, yes, a hopeful book of strategies for delivering the planet from our worst environmental depredations. Read full book review >

JANESVILLE by Amy  Goldstein
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 18, 2017

"A simultaneously enlightening and disturbing look at working-class lives in America's heartland."
A Midwestern town struggles to survive in the aftermath of an economic disaster. Read full book review >
THE AMERICAN SPIRIT by David McCullough
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 18, 2017

"Clio, the muse of history, smiles and nods her head on every page."
A collection of speeches by the Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning historian and biographer. Read full book review >
AWAKENING by Nathaniel Frank
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 24, 2017

"Frank's strikingly detailed, essential reportage reminds readers of the gay community's enduring fight for equality."
A diligent archive of gay marriage equality from its roots as a hopeful pipe dream to its realization as a civil right. Read full book review >
LOAN SHARKS by Charles R. Geisst
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 25, 2017

"Mostly for scholars of economic history and highly motivated lay readers."
A chronological account of money lending and loan sharking with an emphasis on practices in the United States in the past 200 years. Read full book review >
THE GLOBAL NOVEL by Adam Kirsch
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 25, 2017

"An insightful addition to the Columbia Global Reports roster."
A critical appreciation of "world literature," highlighting works that combine specifics of locality with global reach. Read full book review >
SUPERFAST PRIMETIME ULTIMATE NATION by Adam Roberts
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 25, 2017

"Alternately engaging and exasperating dispatches from a conflicted nation."
A report from India at a point of enormous transition—and the news is never really good. Read full book review >
ANATOMY OF TERROR by Ali H. Soufan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 2, 2017

"In a dizzying scenario of violence, Soufan provides clarity and balance."
Tracing the hydra-headed reach of al-Qaida and how its leadership morphed into the Islamic Caliphate of Iraq and elsewhere. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >