Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 4)

AND THE WEAK SUFFER WHAT THEY MUST? by Yanis Varoufakis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 12, 2016

"A defensive but astute, cerebral, and engrossing polemic that conveys knowledge and authority."
The former Greek finance minister argues that the lack of political will and democratic consensus in the euro crisis portends a drift toward authoritarianism. Read full book review >
GLOBAL INEQUALITY by Branko Milanovic
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 11, 2016

"Packed with charts and graphs and not for the numerically faint of heart. For those versed in economics, however, Milanovic provides an illuminating analysis."
The rich get richer, and the world gets poorer. Read full book review >

WARRIOR by Theresa Larson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A courageous and inspiring memoir."
A doctor of physical therapy and former Marine lieutenant tells the story of her painful struggle with bulimia. Read full book review >
PRETENTIOUSNESS by Dan Fox
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 5, 2016

"Not as provocative as it might be, but never pretentious."
A short book puts a positive spin on a term of almost universal disparagement. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A solid overview for general readers."
Prizewinning journalist and Fox News political analyst Williams (Muzzled: The Assault on Honest Debate, 2011, etc.) identifies more than two dozen individuals who helped shape modern America.Read full book review >

CONSEQUENCE by Eric Fair
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A startling debut from a haunted individual who wishes he had left Iraq earlier 'with my soul intact.'"
A candid and deeply unsettling account of the author's work as a government contractor in Iraq charged with interrogating detainees in Baghdad, Fallujah, and Abu Ghraib. Read full book review >
SLEEPING GIANT by Tamara Draut
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 5, 2016

"Readers who concur that we have a 'neoliberal economic system that is systematically rotten to the core' will welcome Draut's impassioned report; others may be unmoved."
A close examination of the plight of the working class, the decline of organized labor's political power, and the stirrings of activism that indicate change may be on the way. Read full book review >
THE NEW CASE FOR GOLD by James Rickards
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 5, 2016

"A provocatively controversial alternative to a leading orthodoxy that should find room on the bookshelves of policymakers and investors."
Rickards (The Death of Money: The Coming Collapse of the International Monetary System, 2014, etc.) advises investors to "simply get some gold."Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 5, 2016

"A tough and vivid account of war and redemption."
In this no-nonsense chronicle of life inside Abu Ghraib prison, first-time author Griffith describes the aftermath of the abuse scandal and the soldiers stationed there afterward. Read full book review >
THE LONG SHADOW OF SMALL GHOSTS by Laura Tillman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 5, 2016

"A Helter Skelter for our time, though without a hint of sensationalism—unsettling in the extreme but written with confidence and deep empathy."
A haunted, haunting examination of mental illness and murder in a more or less ordinary American city. Read full book review >
EVERYDAY SEXISM by Laura Bates
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 5, 2016

"A potent reminder of how far feminism has come and how far it has to go."
A British feminist activist gathers together stories from women worldwide about gender-based denigration suffered in both private and public spheres. Read full book review >
ON BEING RAPED by Raymond M. Douglas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"Courageous, sobering, and cathartic."
A searing, self-reflective account of adult male rape. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >