Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 4)

RESKILLING AMERICA by Katherine S. Newman
Released: April 19, 2016

"A top-notch, highly accessible contribution to the business and popular economics literature."
Now that the tide of outsourcing employment has begun to turn, the time has come to think about how to reverse chronic unemployment among youth in the United States. Read full book review >
Released: April 19, 2016

"An important account of medicine's role in a world in crisis."
A behind-the-scenes look at the nascent field of humanitarian medicine as it has evolved in recent years of civil wars, famines, tsunamis, and other natural and man-made disasters. Read full book review >

GETTING TO GREEN by Frederic C. Rich
Released: April 18, 2016

"Essential reading for anyone with a stake in the environmental debate."
A corporate lawyer and conservation leader argues that only a new bipartisan coalition can end the legislative logjam facing the American environmental movement. Read full book review >
HOLY LANDS by Nicolas Pelham
Released: April 12, 2016

"A lively, succinct, nonpolemical study that will offer much thought for discussion."
A sound, accessible argument for why returning to the mixed-faith communities living among each other in the Ottoman model might just save the Middle East. Read full book review >
Released: April 5, 2016

"A startling debut from a haunted individual who wishes he had left Iraq earlier 'with my soul intact.'"
A candid and deeply unsettling account of the author's work as a government contractor in Iraq charged with interrogating detainees in Baghdad, Fallujah, and Abu Ghraib. Read full book review >

Released: April 5, 2016

"A Helter Skelter for our time, though without a hint of sensationalism—unsettling in the extreme but written with confidence and deep empathy."
A haunted, haunting examination of mental illness and murder in a more or less ordinary American city. Read full book review >
MISSION FAILURE by Michael Mandelbaum
Released: April 1, 2016

"A skilled, persuasive appraisal of a unique moment in our foreign policy history."
An international affairs expert charts America's largely unsuccessful foreign interventions over the past 20 years. Read full book review >
THE WAY OF THE GUN by Iain Overton
Released: March 22, 2016

"A passionate mix of rhetoric and travelogue, Overton's book takes the gun debate into impressive new territory."
In Overton's first book, the British journalist travels the globe to see how the logic of the Second Amendment has affected people beyond America's borders. Read full book review >
EVICTED by Matthew Desmond
Released: March 1, 2016

"This stunning, remarkable book—a scholar's 21st-century How the Other Half Lives—demands a wide audience."
A groundbreaking work on the central role of housing in the lives of the poor. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 2016

"A must-read for military buffs and a should-read for anyone who has given even a cursory thought to the U.S. efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq."
The search for the story behind an IED death leads to the history of the post-9/11 wars and the lives of the men and women who fight them. Read full book review >
BLOOD YEAR by David Kilcullen
Released: Feb. 29, 2016

"Direct, insightful, and frightening, this book will prepare readers to see through the misguided, simplistic solutions to the problems of Middle Eastern policy and Islamic terror so common in this election year."
A "mid-level player in some of the key events of the past decade" delivers a dispassionate, discouraging analysis of how the Western counterterrorism effort has gone so terribly wrong. Read full book review >
SMALL DATA by Martin Lindstrom
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Lindstrom's uncanny ability to detect and decipher seemingly unrelated clues will inspire reporters and detectives as well as companies looking for ways to develop new products and ideas."
A leading marketing guru recounts his firsthand experiences investigating the lives of consumers to develop global branding strategies. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >