Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 44)

CONFESSIONS OF A STREET ADDICT by James J. Cramer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 13, 2002

Wall Street's most notorious bull bares all in this typically over-the-top memoir. Read full book review >
THE LETTERS OF ARTURO TOSCANINI by Harvey Sachs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 28, 2002

"Music, history, and gossip from a master musician and letter-writer. (7 b&w photos)"
A rich and vivid collection of the great conductor's correspondence. Read full book review >

A SONG FLUNG UP TO HEAVEN by Maya Angelou
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 9, 2002

"Alternately elegiac, meditative, and humorous, a book to savor and remember."
The distinguished poet and playwright brings her six-volume cycle of memoirs to a close. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 4, 2002

"Wilkinson learned well from his mentor and brings that emotive, sympathetic bearing, beautiful and melancholy, with great immediacy to this homage."
A lovely tribute to novelist and New Yorker editor William Maxwell (1908-2000), who was for many years a mentor to Wilkinson (A Violent Act, 1993, etc.), as well as a neighbor, a father figure, and a friend. Read full book review >
PAPERBOY by Henry Petroski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 2, 2002

"The author concludes that 'Being an engineer is in fact a lot like being a paperboy,' and by the end, we're convinced as well that no metaphor for life is more apt than a paper route. (30 b&w photos throughout)"
An engineer (Civil Engineering and History/Duke) who has written about pencils, bridges, and other useful things casts a fond—and analytical—look back at his own 1950s youth and once again discovers mystery and magnificence in the mundane. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 25, 2002

"Fascinating through and through, if open to debate."
A sprawling, highly readable history that judges America's long struggle to defeat Communism a necessary battle badly fought from start to finish. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 15, 2002

"A well-reasoned argument for the moral necessity of halting genocide wherever it occurs, and an unpleasant reminder of our role in enabling it, however unwittingly."
The executive director of Harvard's Carr Center for Human Rights Policy presents a superb analysis of the US government's evident unwillingness to intervene in ethnic slaughter. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 5, 2002

"A supremely fascinating look at a 'serious, substantive presidency.' No journalist is better matched to this subject than Klein, and his analysis deserves the wide attention it's bound to get."
"He remains the most compelling politician of his generation, although that isn't saying very much." Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 14, 2002

"A powerful exposé."
Two journalists take the widely publicized case of accused secret agent Wen Ho Lee as an instance of lax security, bureaucratic bungling, misguided energy, and ill-served justice in America. Read full book review >
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. by Marshall Frady
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 14, 2002

"Excellent, as are almost all of the volumes in the Penguin Lives series, and a fitting homage to a man now much honored but little studied."
An exemplary, brief life of the African-American leader who effected epochal changes in his 39 years. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"A hallmark in recent Native American historiography that merits wide attention."
An excellent, ambitious attempt to restore to history long-overlooked Indians who "neither uncompromisingly resisted . . . nor wholeheartedly assimilated" in the face of white encroachment. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 15, 2001

"Ably explored and told, The Prisoners of Cabrera will be of considerable interest to students of the Napoleonic era and of issues of military justice."
Able were they ere they saw Cabrera: a fascinating exploration of an all-but-forgotten footnote in French history. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >