Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 44)

QUICK STUDIES by Alexander Star
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A wonderful collection, offering fine bedside browsing for disaffected grad students, refugees from the university, and fans of solid journalism alike."
A lively greatest-hits collection from the pages of the recently deceased journal Lingua Franca, which "sought to occupy the no-man's-land between the tabloid and the treatise." Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Controversial, yes. Smart, yes. And essential reading for anyone keeping track on world events over the last year."
Sharply pointed, finely delivered observations on world politics and the ongoing war on terrorism, by New York Times columnist Friedman (The Lexus and the Olive Tree, 1999). Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 20, 2002

"Compelling, well written, and extremely moving."
The unsettling story of a mute, nearly catatonic seven-year-old in her special-education classroom. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 15, 2002

"A well-researched, informative nail-biter."
Riveting account of the 1920 sinking of US submarine S-Five and the improbable escape of her crew. Read full book review >
TEACHER by Mark Edmundson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 13, 2002

"A small treasure, both Edmundson's portrait of Lears and his high-relief, visceral snapshot of Medford."
The wry and affecting story of the teacher who got under the author's skin and pointed his life in a new direction, much for the better. Read full book review >

IN LANDS NOT MY OWN by Reuben Ainsztein
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 11, 2002

"Equally appealing to Jewish scholars, military history buffs, and readers looking for a dramatic page-turner."
One man's heroic flight across war-torn Europe. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 20, 2002

"Few historical studies are as daring and engaging as this. Highly recommended for students of foreign policy, history, and global trends."
A brilliant, disquieting essay on geopolitics, warfare, and the future of the state. Read full book review >
CONFESSIONS OF A STREET ADDICT by James J. Cramer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 13, 2002

Wall Street's most notorious bull bares all in this typically over-the-top memoir. Read full book review >
THE LETTERS OF ARTURO TOSCANINI by Harvey Sachs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 28, 2002

"Music, history, and gossip from a master musician and letter-writer. (7 b&w photos)"
A rich and vivid collection of the great conductor's correspondence. Read full book review >
A SONG FLUNG UP TO HEAVEN by Maya Angelou
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 9, 2002

"Alternately elegiac, meditative, and humorous, a book to savor and remember."
The distinguished poet and playwright brings her six-volume cycle of memoirs to a close. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 4, 2002

"Wilkinson learned well from his mentor and brings that emotive, sympathetic bearing, beautiful and melancholy, with great immediacy to this homage."
A lovely tribute to novelist and New Yorker editor William Maxwell (1908-2000), who was for many years a mentor to Wilkinson (A Violent Act, 1993, etc.), as well as a neighbor, a father figure, and a friend. Read full book review >
PAPERBOY by Henry Petroski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 2, 2002

"The author concludes that 'Being an engineer is in fact a lot like being a paperboy,' and by the end, we're convinced as well that no metaphor for life is more apt than a paper route. (30 b&w photos throughout)"
An engineer (Civil Engineering and History/Duke) who has written about pencils, bridges, and other useful things casts a fond—and analytical—look back at his own 1950s youth and once again discovers mystery and magnificence in the mundane. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

The Unexpected Everything is a YA feel-good story of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >