Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 44)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 1, 2003

"A thoughtful, measured tone gives this tale of murder a sense of depth and reach, like a good poem."
Chilling, edgy backgrounder on the high-profile 2002 murder of a fashion journalist. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 1, 2003

"A boon for news junkies, full of solid, eye-opening reporting and smartly delivered opinion."
One man's recent wanderings among Ground Zero, Saddam City, and other global hot spots. Read full book review >

FIRST LOVES by Ted Solotaroff
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 26, 2003

"Meets the very high standard set by Alfred Kazin's Starting Out in the Thirties for describing a young man's intellectual coming-of-age with nuanced honesty and genuine emotion. Let's hope Solotaroff doesn't take five more years to get to New American Review."
Noted editor Solotaroff picks up where Truth Comes in Blows (1998) left off, describing with compassionate acuity the difficult early adult years that led to his vocation as a literary journalist. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 2, 2003

"A welcome contribution, full of untold stories, to the literature of WWII."
A fine tale of great and not-so-great escapes, along with the ordinary business of surviving confinement in Hitler's stalags in the final months of WWII. Read full book review >
AS OF THIS WRITING by Clive James
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2003

"Criticism is not indispensable to art,' James writes. 'It is indispensable to civilization—a more inclusive thing.' His stimulating and thrilling work forcefully makes a case for that bold declaration."
Superb collection of criticism at once deeply serious and deliberately accessible, more than justifying its author's claim that "readability is intelligence." Read full book review >

THE GENERAL by Paul Williams
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 28, 2003

"Fascinating and colorful."
Veteran Irish crime journalist Williams exhaustively documents the amazing 20-year career of arch-burglar Martin Cahill. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2003

"As indeed, anyone reading Hutton's useful, sobering study is likely to conclude: we do."
Who's more dangerous to world peace: Saddam or a golf-playing, pension fund-robbing, churchgoing Republican? Read full book review >
DEATH AS A WAY OF LIFE by David Grossman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2003

"Chillingly, sometimes agonizingly, eloquent on hope's fading light."
Can Israel and Palestine ever make peace? Israeli novelist Grossman (Be My Knife, 2002, etc.) addresses this question from the perspective of a Jerusalem journalist who is also a husband, father, and peace activist bitterly frustrated by the leaders of both sides. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 16, 2003

"Deeply satisfying account of a rotten crime solved by chemical sleuthing."
The expertly told story of a murder and a molecule. Read full book review >
GULAG by Anne Applebaum
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 15, 2003

"Extraordinary in its range and lucidity: a most welcome companion to Bernard-Henri Levi's Barbarism With a Human Face, Robert Conquest's The Great Terror, and, of course, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago."
A searing, engrossing history of the most extensive, longest-lived experiment in "rationalized evil" the world has ever known. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 15, 2003

"Indispensable for understanding the role of secret intelligence in foreign policy and national defense."
Of spooks, spies, double agents, and Ivy League gentlemen who certainly did read each other's mail: former CIA director Helms revisits a long career doing Uncle Sam's shadow work. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 9, 2003

"Fine seafaring adventure, expertly narrated: for maritime historians and fans of Hornblower and Aubrey alike."
A superb recounting of a strange affair indeed: an incident of mutiny on the high seas that American naval history has long forgotten. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >