Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 44)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 8, 2002

"Powerful, evenhanded, thoroughly edifying."
An illuminating portrait, by a first-class investigative journalist, of the half-century-long civil war that has divided Cuban against itself. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Clear-eyed reporting and graceful prose in a highly readable—and sobering—work of political geography for policymakers and anyone concerned by the risks of an uncertain future."
Pakistan is a terrorist haven, a nest of corruption, a tinhorn dictatorship—and, writes New Yorker correspondent and long-time Pakistan resident Weaver, a supposed friend whose future is of great strategic importance to the US. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 16, 2002

"A book of sorrows—and of surpassing importance."
Avowed integrationist Irons (Political Science/UC San Diego; A People's History of the Supreme Court, not reviewed) powerfully summarizes Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka and argues compellingly that subsequent court cases have effected resegregation and the resurrection of Jim Crow. Read full book review >
QUICK STUDIES by Alexander Star
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A wonderful collection, offering fine bedside browsing for disaffected grad students, refugees from the university, and fans of solid journalism alike."
A lively greatest-hits collection from the pages of the recently deceased journal Lingua Franca, which "sought to occupy the no-man's-land between the tabloid and the treatise." Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Controversial, yes. Smart, yes. And essential reading for anyone keeping track on world events over the last year."
Sharply pointed, finely delivered observations on world politics and the ongoing war on terrorism, by New York Times columnist Friedman (The Lexus and the Olive Tree, 1999). Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 20, 2002

"Compelling, well written, and extremely moving."
The unsettling story of a mute, nearly catatonic seven-year-old in her special-education classroom. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 15, 2002

"A well-researched, informative nail-biter."
Riveting account of the 1920 sinking of US submarine S-Five and the improbable escape of her crew. Read full book review >
TEACHER by Mark Edmundson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 13, 2002

"A small treasure, both Edmundson's portrait of Lears and his high-relief, visceral snapshot of Medford."
The wry and affecting story of the teacher who got under the author's skin and pointed his life in a new direction, much for the better. Read full book review >
IN LANDS NOT MY OWN by Reuben Ainsztein
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 11, 2002

"Equally appealing to Jewish scholars, military history buffs, and readers looking for a dramatic page-turner."
One man's heroic flight across war-torn Europe. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 20, 2002

"Few historical studies are as daring and engaging as this. Highly recommended for students of foreign policy, history, and global trends."
A brilliant, disquieting essay on geopolitics, warfare, and the future of the state. Read full book review >
CONFESSIONS OF A STREET ADDICT by James J. Cramer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 13, 2002

Wall Street's most notorious bull bares all in this typically over-the-top memoir. Read full book review >
THE LETTERS OF ARTURO TOSCANINI by Harvey Sachs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 28, 2002

"Music, history, and gossip from a master musician and letter-writer. (7 b&w photos)"
A rich and vivid collection of the great conductor's correspondence. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >