Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 497)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 13, 1995

"American values,'' makes this good book especially timely."
Tailgunner Joe rises from the grave in this nightmarish, spellbinding excursion into our nation's recent past. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 10, 1995

"Students of history and policy should pay heed."
A trenchant deconstruction of much-ballyhooed revelations (in Official and Confidential: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover, by Anthony Summers, 1993) that longtime FBI director J. Edgar Hoover was gay—plus an analysis of Hoover's policies toward sex and crime. Read full book review >

TOM PAINE by John Keane
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 6, 1995

"Nothing really new here (despite occasional sniping at minor errors by previous Paine biographers) but a solid, well-written portrait that reiterates Paine's ongoing importance in contemporary discussions of democracy's potential and perils."
An aptly subtitled biography of the trailblazing political polemicist: This detailed account finds virtually no trace of a personal life. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"A delightfully written account, full of bold insights into the Irish character and its continuity through the ages."
Scholarship, humor, and a keen understanding of human nature combine in this history of Ireland and her rarely acknowledged contribution to European culture. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"Her book cries out to be written in a more fertile style."
A formal, leaden treatment that uses the lives and works of Olsen and Le Sueur to map the complex juncture of left-wing politics, second-wave feminism, and modern culture. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"Authoritative perspectives on a consequential country that remains indominatably foreign for most of the West. (Graphs and tabular material)"
A collection of perceptive essays from a top Asian scholar who sheds considerable light on how Japan managed to become a world- class economic power following its defeat in WW II. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"If there is a major flaw in this unexciting but very sensible book, it is its failure to address the possibility of a renewed security threat from a Russia attempting to recover control of the former Soviet empire."
This proposal for a radically different US defense posture will not soon convert official Washington, but it nonetheless deserves to be heard. Read full book review >
FBI SECRETS by M. Wesley Swearingen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

A 25-year FBI veteran makes convincing claims that the agency has been waging a secret war on the citizens of the United States for more than half a century. Read full book review >
GENIUS IN DISGUISE by Thomas Kunkel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1995

"Kunkel writes with such fair-mindedness and so convincingly that readers, including the old lady from Dubuque, will need to remind themselves that they didn't know Ross personally."
A thoroughly classy profile of the famously demanding founder and editor of the New Yorker. Read full book review >
RETHINKING SCHOOLS by David Levine
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"Not much news for those who are up on the subject, but a good overview for the interested layperson."
A liberal critique of our schools and some ideas for possible solutions. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"Argued with a voice of reason and experience."
A cogent collection of essays and academic papers suggesting that multiculturalism in the classroom is an illusion that masks miscommunication and the continuation of a white-male-dominated society. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"Lacking cohesiveness and closure, this good-natured account doesn't quite add up to the sum of its fascinating parts. (100 b&w photos, not seen)"
A rich study of the role of the Municipal Art Society in the urban planning and development of New York City throughout the 20th century. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Laini Taylor
March 27, 2017

In bestselling YA writer Laini Taylor’s new fantasy novel, Strange the Dreamer, the dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he's been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever. What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving? “Lovers of intricate worldbuilding and feverish romance will find this enthralling,” our critic writes. View video >