Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 497)

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 6, 1995

"Perhaps we live in an age overly obsessed with the smallest details of the self, but just too much of this account exists at the surface level of facts, sight substituting for insight. (5 photos, 9 illustrations, 4 maps)"
A clunky memoir by a Japanese-American doctor recounting his work with survivors of the atomic bomb. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 2, 1995

"Sowell's venomous tone dominates his own, sometimes thin evidence, making this a polarizing screed rather than a rational argument."
Conservative gadfly Sowell doesn't like the vision thing—at least, not as long as the vision is that of his political opponents on the left. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"But this fascinating book will restore faith in the judiciary and in the men and women who wear its robes."
An intense and accessible behind-the-bench examination of the Supreme Court's surprising drift to the center. Read full book review >
CORRESPONDENCE by Paul Celan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Poignant reading and an absolute must for anyone interested in 20th century literature or the effects of the Holocaust on those it touched."
A slender but important volume of nearly all the letters that passed between Nelly Sachs, a Nobel laureate in literature, and Paul Celan, one of the greatest poets of this century. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"An authoritative albeit tedious audit of what the cloak-and- dagger bureaucracies could do for their countryif pols had the will and money to back them."
An academic's dry-as-dust assessment of US intelligence needs in the turbulent times to come. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

An inept, superficial, and histrionic biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald's daughter by her own daughter. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"An absorbing and detailed critique of the French intelligence community."
An authoritative analysis of the complex role of intelligence services in modern French history. Read full book review >
HIROSHIMA NOTES by Kenzaburo Oe
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Disappointing overall, considering who the author is, but the first essay in the collection is essential reading."
Reissued with a new introduction by the author for the 50th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Nobel Prize winner Oe's 19635 ruminations on the Atomic Age are still timely. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Covers well-trod ground, but succeeds in bringing a personal dimensionof both victims and perpetratorsto the historical record."
The evacuation from their homes and relocation to internment camps of Japanese-Americans during WW II had, Smith (Rediscovering Christianity, 1994, etc.) contends, at least one positive result: by toppling the existing immigrant social structure and changing the course of lives, it sped up the process of assimilation. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"It's not fast-food reading; it's serious food for thought."
Political scientist Barber (Rutgers; An Aristocracy of Everyone, 1992, etc.) grandly divides the planet into no more and no less than two camps to explain the present universal, sorry mess. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"The New York subway's modern minstrels are a lyrical subject that here undergoes a lengthy and pedantic scrutiny in a prose devoid of lyricism. (27 b&w photos, not seen)"
A community activist details the culture and conflicts of New York subway music, from bucket-drummers to city bureaucrats. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"A long, discursive survey of American attitudes toward governance since colonial times, which, although often thoughtful and eloquently written, has no clear point."
Historian Wishy (Jefferson and the American Revolutionary Ideal, not reviewed, etc.) traces the historic tension in American life between Jeffersonian ideals of minimal intrusion by the state and the reality of increasingly expansive government. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >