Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 497)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"A good idea, executed in a manner that will reinforce the widely held opinion that history is boring."
A historian celebrates America's democratic past with an overview of fundamental changes in American culture. Read full book review >
JEWISH STATE OR ISRAELI NATION? by Boas Evron
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"A pseudo-intellectual drive-by with a misfiring Uzi."
A jaded, outdated manifesto of post-Zionism by an Israeli journalist. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"Fairclough has documented an American success story in this valuable contribution to the literature of the civil rights movement."
A richly detailed, scholarly examination of the rise of the civil rights movement in Louisiana. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"In this thoughtful social history, Payne gives due regard to those activists great and small. (27 b&w photographs, map, not seen)"
With this history of the civil rights movement focusing on the Everyman turned hero, the commoner as crusader for justice, Payne challenges the old idea that history is the biography of great men. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"One can't help but wish that Powers had decided what book she really wanted to write—her political autobiography or her schoolgirlish romantic diary. (photos, not seen) (First printing of 30,000; author tour)"
As one of the few women to hold a leadership position in the civil rights movement, Powers has a compelling story, but it is far overshadowed by her kiss-and-tell tales about her affair with Martin Luther King Jr. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1995

"A good alternative to much true-crime ephemera. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A breezy, enjoyable, and informative collection of anecdotes by the FBI crime lab, by an enthusiastic if unskeptical fan. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 31, 1995

"Useful mainly to journalists and history buffs. (First serial to Civilization)"
Though disconnected, an interesting defense of the 1950s work of columnists Joe and Stewart Alsop. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 30, 1995

"Repetitive, simplistic, and inadvertently humorous, this book will not win sympathy for its legalistic defense of segregation."
A candid but unenlightening memoir of the failed effort to defend segregation before the Supreme Court in Brown v. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 15, 1995

"Superb social history."
Gathering together seven lectures by distinguished academic historians, Hufton (History/Oxford Univ.) introduces a much-needed historical perspective into the contemporary discussion on human rights. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 13, 1995

"American values,'' makes this good book especially timely."
Tailgunner Joe rises from the grave in this nightmarish, spellbinding excursion into our nation's recent past. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 10, 1995

"Students of history and policy should pay heed."
A trenchant deconstruction of much-ballyhooed revelations (in Official and Confidential: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover, by Anthony Summers, 1993) that longtime FBI director J. Edgar Hoover was gay—plus an analysis of Hoover's policies toward sex and crime. Read full book review >
TOM PAINE by John Keane
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 6, 1995

"Nothing really new here (despite occasional sniping at minor errors by previous Paine biographers) but a solid, well-written portrait that reiterates Paine's ongoing importance in contemporary discussions of democracy's potential and perils."
An aptly subtitled biography of the trailblazing political polemicist: This detailed account finds virtually no trace of a personal life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >