Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 498)

MOB LAWYER by Frank Ragano
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1994

A riveting memoir of life inside the murderous world of Mafia chieftain Santo Trafficante and Teamster boss Jimmy Hoffa, by their personal lawyer (and longtime New York Times reporter Raab)—filled with chilling, credible revelations of mob involvement in the murders of President Kennedy and Hoffa. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1994

"A disturbing snapshot of a nation in crisis, with a critical message: If you love your country, take action."
From Pulitzer Prize-winner Johnson (Sleepwalking through History, 1991): a depressing look at America's disintegrating society and the moribund American dream. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1994

"Some anecdotes and examples are repeated from earlier works, but this is must reading for Kohl fanciers and anyone looking for the humanity buried in the long debate about why Johnny can't read."
The five essays in this book are powerful reminders that currently popular ideas of school choice may be only another trendy veneer disguising the deeply rooted problems of public education. Read full book review >
THE SOUL OF THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY by George M. Marsden
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1994

"Jewish or Catholic institutions, most Southern and African-American colleges, and conservative Protestant colleges."
In pleading for universities to give religious teachings the same respect they give feminist and multicultural perspectives, Marsden (History/Notre Dame, The Secularization of the Academy, etc.) cogently argues that major American universities, founded essentially as religious institutions, are now so hostile to religion that they largely exclude religious viewpoints. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1994

An angry and vengeful account of an act of possibly-not- gratuitous violence that turned a 14-year-old into a quadriplegic. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 1, 1994

"A savvy reckoning of the cost of the zero-sum games the American people play."
A we-have-met-the-enemy-and-he-is-us tract that, for all its evenhanded approach to an obvious dilemma, appears as likely to attract bipartisan opprobrium as to spark a debate on the overburdened state of the union. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1994

"Photos and helpful tabular material throughout."
A scholar's original and illuminating interpretation of what makes Japan a power to be reckoned with in the global village's marketplace. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1994

"Lamentably, Flake's discursive prose and scattershot approach to reporting facts and events paints a somewhat bland, albeit accurate, portrait of a city well-known for its spicy cuisine."
An informative if somewhat longwinded paean to the dying traditions that fuel the annual Carnival, as well as a portrait of changing times in the Crescent City. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1994

"In brief, then, an interpretive, warts-and-all portrait of a consequential conservative. (8 pages of photos—not seen.)"
Herzstein (History/Univ. of South Carolina) offers a liberal's critical appraisal of the life, times, and fortunes of Henry Robinson Luce at the height of his considerable powers during the convulsive period that preceded and encompassed WW II. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 1, 1994

"An important social document, though not consistently successful as a piece of literature."
Noted Chinese novelist Pu Ning recounts in the first person the harrowing trials of Han Wei-tien, arrested in 1951 on charges that he spied for Chiang Kai-shek. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 30, 1994

Through her experiences as both reporter and victim of the vicious Colombian drug cartels, Duz†n reveals the symbiotic yet deadly relationship between the drug bosses and her country's political and economic history. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 28, 1994

"A grim book that weighs vital questions of guilt, responsibility, and forgiveness."
The story of an SS war criminal, seen through the eyes of Holocaust survivors, and how it took 50 years to bring him to justice. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >