Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 498)

HUDDLE by Andrew H. Malcolm
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Well written and at times astute, but not what you'd expect from a writer nominated five times for a Pulitzer."
An odd entry from talented and usually trenchant New York Times reporter and columnist Malcolm (Someday, 1991, etc.)—a paean to high-school football and those who coach it, with nary a negative word for either. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A provocative, detailed view, if somewhat disorganized and repetitious, offering ample evidence that the war was far from over after the soldiers went home."
A careful assessment of the environmental damage wrought by both sides in Operation Desert Storm, locally and globally, from Boston-based science-writer Hawley. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Familiar examples and few new insights, but, still, a cogent and evenhanded summary of generally available information about the influence of TV on politicking. (Forty halftones, ten graphs—not seen.)"
An attempt to determine the extent to which TV has contributed to the manipulation of political campaigns—and what can be done about it; by Jamieson (Communication/Univ. of Penn.; Eloquence in an Electronic Age, 1988, etc.). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"It's in portraying these marginal lives that she's most effective. (Illustrations—not seen.)"
Fifteen brief but sensitive vignettes and a longer epilogue by Blais (Journalism/Univ. of Mass. at Amherst), a Pulitzer-winning former writer for the Miami Herald. Read full book review >
FAMILY MATTERS by David Guterson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A literate primer for anyone who wants to know more about alternatives to the schools."
A wide-ranging look at the benefits of parents educating their children at home. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"No milestone in criminological history but, rather, light, knowledgeable, appealingly ghastly fare for true-crime buffs. (Sixteen pages of photographs—not seen.)"
That in 1748 novelist Henry Fielding, then a London magistrate, formed the Bow Street Runners—the precursor of Scotland Yard—is just one of the enjoyable curiosities that Jeffers (Who Killed Precious?, 1991, etc.) presents in this lively account of England's famed police force. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Unique and important in recent addiction literature: a very fine achievement."
Brilliant and terrifying evocation of the crack monster devouring Washington, D.C., coupled with addicts' biographies. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"MacDonald raises as many questions as she answers, but, by writing the first book on a disturbing subject, she's also provided a useful and informative introduction. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
A thoughtful if inconclusive study of female terrorists by a writer for The Observer. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"The big picture, in large strokes, by a man of unusual courage in going out on limbs."
Following Oliver Stone's JFK, Prouty (whom Stone depicted as ``X,'' Jim Garrison's secret informant on the military-industrial complex) offers an update on the assassination. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Passionate, reasoned, and untendentious—easily deserving a visible place on the Crisis-in-the-Colleges shelf."
Another faithful-oppositionist lament over—and explanation of—the wreckage of American college education, this time from English professor Douglas (Univ. of Illinois; All Aboard!, The Smart Magazines, etc.). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 31, 1992

"That these oft-deprecated virtues obviously helped him through some very rough times represents the most important message of this low-key testament. (Illustrations, including facsimiles of journal entries smuggled out of Iran.)"
The personal journal of the highest-ranking US envoy to be interned during the 444-day siege that became known as the Iran Hostage Crisis. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 20, 1992

"Not very incisive in analyzing the war's military significance, but highly colorful in depicting Americans in the blood-roar of nationalism. (B&w photos, maps—not seen.)"
A popular history of the ship whose sinking propelled the US into the Spanish-American War—and into a new, uncomfortable role as an overseas empire. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jodi Picoult and Samantha van Leer
authors of OFF THE PAGE
May 19, 2015

Meet Oliver, a prince literally taken from the pages of a fairy tale and transported into the real world. Meet Delilah, the girl who wished Oliver into being. In bestseller Jodi Picoult and her daughter Samantha van Leer’s new young adult novel, Off the Page, it’s a miracle that seems perfect at first—but there are complications. To exist in Delilah’s world, Oliver must take the place of a regular boy. Enter Edgar, who agrees to play Oliver’s role in the pages of Delilah’s favorite book. But just when it seems that the plan will work, everything gets turned upside down. We talk to the mother-daughter team on Kirkus TV. View video >