Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 499)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"A worthy antidote to tourist images of a smiling island."
A memorable, elegantly written portrait—part history, part travelogue—of the Jamaican subculture of political gangsters and drug-dealing outlaws. Read full book review >
AN ETHIC FOR ENEMIES by Jr. Shriver
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"For anyone concerned with the continual cycles of vengeance and retaliation in our world, Shriver's book offers a well-argued vision of hope."
A compelling case for forgiveness—traditionally thought of as the way to heal disputes between persons—as the route to better relations between peoples. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"Simplistic and self-congratulatory."
A faulty diagnosis of what ails our schools, and an account of one woman's inconclusive attempt to cure them. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 1995

"Not a good advertisement for books by television reporters. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
The true-crime tale of Walter Leroy Moody, convicted of killing a federal judge in Birmingham, Ala., and an NAACP lawyer in Savannah, Ga., with letter bombs. Read full book review >
THE QUEEN by Kenneth Harris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 1995

"A royal rehash that's a royal bore."
Harris (Thatcher, 1988, etc.) provides a dreary if competent chronological summary of Queen Elizabeth II's life and role in British history. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 1995

"His amateur pop-psychological analyses of the killers' family lives aside, Smith, a solid writer and an excellent reporter (he writes for Esquire), makes this horrendous story almost readable. (Photos, not seen)"
This intricate re-creation of the February 1993 murder of three-year-old James Bulger by two 10-year-old boys in Bottle, England, is ugly, painful reading. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 26, 1995

The fabled first 100 days of FDR's administration in 1933 set the tone for how people would come to think of the New Deal: an aggressive attack on depression and poverty by an activist federal government willing to throw enormous sums of money at economic problems. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 22, 1995

"A powerful argument that we should all avoid sloganeering about the death penalty and think more carefully about justice. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Washington Post reporter Drehle (formerly of the Miami Herald) crafts a gripping narrative traversing the world of the death penalty. ``Twenty men have been sentenced to die under Florida's modern death penalty laws for every one who has been executed,'' he writes. ``Nothing but chance has separated those who live from those who died.'' Though he reviews (and refutes) the standard prodeath penalty arguments of deterrence and retribution, Drehle's concern is with the flawed system in practice. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 20, 1995

"Weinberg, who struggles to withhold judgment and to weigh Denard's version of events against legend and verifiable fact, tells it well. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A British journalist sets off to find a modern-day pirate and soldier of fortune involved in numerous coups, revolutions, and assassinations in post-colonial Africa. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 20, 1995

"Gilbert's very specialized manual of arms will appeal to the Soldier of Fortune crowd as well as military history buffs. (16 pages photos, not seen)"
An exhaustive, ice-cold briefing that tracks the martial art of sniping from colonial America through the brushfire conflicts of the present day. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 15, 1995

"A well-crafted work of history that not only gives insight into the lives and thought of the two men but also stimulates thought about the public institutions they helped to create."
Drawing on the celebrated correspondence between Thomas Jefferson and James Madison about the newly adopted Constitution, Banning listens in on ``three of many conversations that occurred between two founders on matters of continuing concern.'' (See p. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 15, 1995

"Intricately detailed and perceptively digressive, Falkner's work is as good as the best books by Donald Honig or Roger Kahn. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Like all fine sports biographies, this one is not merely about an athlete. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >