Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 499)

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Readers who wish to be outraged should enjoy this polemic, but Rothwax offers little to those who seek a better understanding of the questions that he so provocatively raises. (The text includes no index or case citations.) (Author tour)"
A frustrated New York State Supreme Court justice argues that the criminal justice system has forsaken the search for truth in favor of legal gamesmanship; his book, however, is a better example of the latter. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"One of the most incisive and potentially influential analyses of the implications of the fall of Communism."
A timely and relevant analysis of the post-Communist world that seeks to explain the fall of Communism and, perhaps without intending to do so, drops an intellectual bomb into the budget debate in the US. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Sprawling, unsubtle, given to rhetorical excess—like the Justice Department itself. (Author tour)"
America's Justice Department overkilled. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 30, 1996

"Christie fans will enjoy; others may wonder what the fuss is about. (photos, not seen) (First printing of 50,000; $50,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Admiring, sometimes cloyingly worshipful bio of New Jersey's governor. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 22, 1996

"While some of the results here are intriguing, most readers will no doubt prefer having the contents filtered by their favorite pundits. (16 line drawings) (Author tour)"
One of those books destined to be more talked about than read: Two political scientists offer an interesting take on negative advertising in election campaigns. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 18, 1996

Eleanor Roosevelt receives her due as a leading influence on recent American liberal thought. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 17, 1996

"General readers will find a wealth in Hamill's pages as well."
This exemplary collection of journalism is fueled by a powerful nostalgia for a New York—and a world—that once was. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 17, 1996

"Neuman's book is interesting as a historical review but superficial as political analysis because of its failure to consider fundamental questions of the relationship of the media to society. (8 pages photos, not seen)"
Neuman, foreign editor of USA Today, claims to debunk myths about the power of technology to shape world events. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 1996

"A British backbencher would be amused by the suggestion that parliamentary government is efficient and democratic, as would an American by the author's asserting the moral authority of the House of Representatives. (Author tour)"
With breathtaking oversimplification, Lazare, New York editor of In These Times, reduces America's problems to the inefficiencies wrought by its Constitution. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 1996

"Although perhaps of more interest to students of sociology than to the general reader, Moore's study warmly tells a success story about a little-known aspect of WW II."
In an original contribution to the extensive WW II literature, Moore (Sociology/SUNY, Buffalo) has compiled oral histories of African-American women who served in the Women's Army Corps (WAC) 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 10, 1996

This is an alarming record of the rapid growth since 1994 of the militia movement in this country—the movement that, as Stern shows, nurtured the radical anti-government ideology shared by Timothy McVeigh, accused of bombing the federal building in Oklahoma City. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 9, 1996

"Interesting and sometimes inspiring, but omits too much to be the outstanding memoir it might have been. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Literary Guild featured alternate; author tour)"
An African-American educator, political figure, and Baptist preacher recounts his life and times eloquently but too selectively. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >