Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 499)

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Covers well-trod ground, but succeeds in bringing a personal dimensionof both victims and perpetratorsto the historical record."
The evacuation from their homes and relocation to internment camps of Japanese-Americans during WW II had, Smith (Rediscovering Christianity, 1994, etc.) contends, at least one positive result: by toppling the existing immigrant social structure and changing the course of lives, it sped up the process of assimilation. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"It's not fast-food reading; it's serious food for thought."
Political scientist Barber (Rutgers; An Aristocracy of Everyone, 1992, etc.) grandly divides the planet into no more and no less than two camps to explain the present universal, sorry mess. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"The New York subway's modern minstrels are a lyrical subject that here undergoes a lengthy and pedantic scrutiny in a prose devoid of lyricism. (27 b&w photos, not seen)"
A community activist details the culture and conflicts of New York subway music, from bucket-drummers to city bureaucrats. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"A long, discursive survey of American attitudes toward governance since colonial times, which, although often thoughtful and eloquently written, has no clear point."
Historian Wishy (Jefferson and the American Revolutionary Ideal, not reviewed, etc.) traces the historic tension in American life between Jeffersonian ideals of minimal intrusion by the state and the reality of increasingly expansive government. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Uncommonly sensible and heartfelt perspectives on being green, from a concerned citizen for whom environmentalism has become a matter of enlightened self-interest."
An engaging and thought-provoking memoir from a political conservative whose environmental consciousness was raised during a stint as co-head of a watchdog agency. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Warner's reader-friendly prose exposes some interesting details about the semi-secret war in Laos."
An engagingly written examination of America's not-so-secret war in Laos, told mainly by anecdote, using the colorful stories of a half dozen Americans who played pivotal roles. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 30, 1995

"Raack's conclusions may sometimes run ahead of the available evidence, and he may make insufficient allowance for the difficulty the Allies opposing Soviet expansion faced, but this is a useful corrective to much naive, uninformed, and ideologically blinkered history."
A revisionist look at Stalin's foreign policy up to and during WW II that confirms most of the harshest judgments about it, and then some. Read full book review >
THEODORE H. WHITE AND JOURNALISM AS ILLUSION by Joyce Hoffmann
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 28, 1995

"A fist-rate look at how newsand historycan be created and manipulated."
Hoffmann (Journalism/Old Dominion Univ.) compellingly argues that one of America's most distinguished journalists used his prestige and eloquence to manufacture influential illusions about great men and events rather than to tell the truth as he saw it. Read full book review >
THE ASHES OF WACO by Dick J. Reavis
NON-FICTION
Released: July 24, 1995

Rushed to press to catch the wave of summer congressional hearings on the Waco debacle, this account by former Texas Monthly senior editor Reavis may raise a few hackles both within the Beltway and beyond. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 19, 1995

"An estimable contribution to the quiet debate on an issue of genuine, if unappreciated, consequence for the electorate."
An ex-insider's thoughtful case for the proposition that since the end of WW II the US Congress has effectively abdicated its responsibility to play an active, vital role in the nation's foreign affairs. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 18, 1995

"Eloquent, somber, and immensely thought-provoking. (Book-of- the-Month Club/History Book Club featured alternates)"
Noted authors Lifton (Protean Self, 1993, etc.) and Mitchell (The Campaign of the Century, 1992) ``explore what happened to America as a consequence of Hiroshimaboth the bomb's existence in the world, and our having used it.'' In a painstaking and painful psycho-historical analysis, the authors are concerned with examining the motivations of those who made the decisions, particularly Truman, and the effects of that decision on Truman and on the development of subsequent US policy. Read full book review >
FULBRIGHT by Randall Bennett Woods
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 17, 1995

"A window into US history from the genesis of the Cold War to America's withdrawal from Vietnam: crucial reading for anyone who would understand the politics of that era. (15 halftones, not seen)"
A cool, intellectual biography of the patrician southern politician who became one of America's most influential opponents of the Vietnam war. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >