Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 5)

LIBERATING MINDS by Ellen Condliffe Lagemann
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A valuable arsenal of information for policymakers seeking prison reform in the present political climate."
A strong argument for expanding college-level study in the nation's prisons. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Suitable primarily for working journalists and others concerned with support of a free press, this is a provocative compendium of issues confronting journalism as new technologies pose an array of threats to independent reporting."
Forget going to jail to protect your source—the government can simply identify her through metadata. Read full book review >

AGE OF ANGER by Pankaj Mishra
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A probing, well-informed investigation of global unrest calling for 'truly transformative thinking' about humanity's future."
How the failures of capitalism have led to "fear, confusion, loneliness and loss"—and global anger. Read full book review >
SINGAPORE by John Curtis Perry
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 6, 2017

"A brief, affectionate history of Singapore that provides a compelling but incomplete and surprisingly discursive portrait of the island nation."
The history of Singapore's improbable path to becoming an economically powerful city-state. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"Easily digested research and personal stories in support of breast-feeding and its importance to mothers and their children."
Why breast-feeding is often frowned upon in the United States despite the well-documented health benefits for both mother and child. Read full book review >

FAMOUS FAILS! by Crispin Boyer
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"An unusual and satisfying collection, and who will quibble with the Chicago Cubs' 'Lesson Learned': 'Believe you will succeed!'? (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
If at first you don't succeed, then at least enjoy the epic failures of others, for as well as the pleasures of schadenfreude, there are lessons to be learned. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 2017

"Attention-grabbing research that amply shows the many detriments of social media, particularly for young adults."
The latest exploration of why social media may not be so great after all. Read full book review >
POWER PLAY by Asi Burak
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"A rejoinder to the anti-technological and a solid piece of pop-culture/business journalism."
When trouble comes calling, hit the joystick: an insider's view of the good things that can emerge from being glued to a screen. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"Despite patches of gee-whiz formulaic prose ('the Airbnb marketplace had the most incredible structural momentum that many of the company's investors and executives had ever seen'), Stone's account is illuminating reading for the business-minded."
Celebratory biography of the upstart companies that regulators love to hate. Read full book review >
LONG SHOT by Craig Hodges
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A skillfully told, affecting memoir of sports and social activism."
A former professional basketball player looks back on his life on and off the court, with an emphasis on how his outspokenness regarding racial discrimination led to his unofficial banishment from the NBA. Read full book review >
AUDACITY by Jonathan Chait
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 17, 2017

"Chait offers a well-organized, clearly written case that will be valuable to future historians in their assessments. The question is whether readers with different opinions about Obama's performance will alter those opinions."
A cogent argument that President Barack Obama has mostly succeeded in implementing his agenda. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >