Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 5)

TOO BIG TO JAIL by Brandon L. Garrett
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"Garrett combines groundbreaking research with clear writing and moral outrage."
Garrett (Law/Univ. of Virginia; Convicting the Innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong, 2011, etc.) presents research on criminal behavior by corporations in the United States and overseas. Read full book review >
SECTION 60 by Robert M. Poole
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"A momentous and moving follow-up to On Hallowed Ground."
An honorable survey of Arlington National Cemetery's subdivision for military personnel killed in the global war on terror. Read full book review >

JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"Emotionally profound, necessary reading."
A distinguished NYU law professor and MacArthur grant recipient offers the compelling story of the legal practice he founded to protect the rights of people on the margins of American society. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 18, 2014

"A sharp, immensely readable account of how we've arrived at this juncture and where matters stand as we anticipate the election of a new president."
A distinguished journalist and scholar looks at the shaping of America's national security and foreign policy for the past decade. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"An electrifying, empathetic work of journalism that makes a four-year-old story feel fresh."
The mind-boggling story of 33 Chilean miners trapped 2,000 feet underground for 10 weeks. Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"The light of Dawisha's research penetrates a deep moral darkness, revealing something ugly—and dangerous."
A damning account of Vladimir Putin's rise to power and of the vast dimensions of the corruption—political and economic—that both reigns and rots in Russia. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"Imagine a true-life, courtroom version of Heart of Darkness."
Here's a twist: the almost unbelievable tale of a human rights attorney every bit as conscienceless as the multinational he was suing. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"An urgent report on the state of American aspirations and a haunting dispatch from forsaken streets."
Ambitious, moving tale of an inner-city Newark kid who made it to Yale yet succumbed to old demons and economic realities. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"Comprehensive research underlies this compelling, highly emotional and profoundly important story."
A novelist and Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter explores with nearly Javert-ian persistence one of the early cases of traffic fatalities caused by texting while driving.
Read full book review >
PREDATOR by Richard Whittle
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"For students of technological history and political wrangling alike, the book is endlessly interesting and full of implication."
They may soon be delivering this book to you, but for now, writes Woodrow Wilson Center global fellow Whittle in this follow-up to his excellent The Dream Machine: The Untold History of the Notorious V-22 Osprey (2010), drones are anything but your friends. Read full book review >
HATE CRIMES IN CYBERSPACE by Danielle Keats Citron
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"Frightening and infuriating, this demand for legal accountability for Internet barbarism deserves widespread exposure and serious consideration."
An impassioned call for equal rights for women on the Internet. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"A must-read for policymakers at all levels and recommended for anyone who wants to understand housing problems while working toward solutions."
A passionate but well-reasoned call to reinvigorate federal support for affordable housing. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >