Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 5)

EUROPE'S LAST CHANCE by Guy Verhofstadt
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A proper diagnosis, likely some good medicine, delivered with an unfortunate bedside manner."
With the entire European project severely threatened, Belgium's former prime minister offers a prescription to save the European Union. Read full book review >
THE BIG STICK by Eliot A. Cohen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"An argument, likely to fall on sympathetic ears in Washington, that when it comes to power and armaments, more is better."
Talk is cheap, but a fleet of aircraft carriers and plenty of nukes—that's something. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 2017

"A useful handbook for understanding the current status of the U.S. in global affairs."
A foreign policy insider parses American diplomatic theories and practices overseas. Read full book review >
CIVILIANIZED by Michael Anthony
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 27, 2016

"An intense memoir that could have been more fully fleshed out."
A young war veteran tells the story of how his tour in Iraq left him unable to cope with day-to-day civilian life. Read full book review >
DEBRIEFING THE PRESIDENT by John Nixon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 27, 2016

"An intelligent and readable postscript to the Iraq War that will be valuable for future historians."
A report on the CIA's interrogation of deposed Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein (1937-2006). Read full book review >

Blue News by Lance LoRusso
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 13, 2016

"A perceptive work provides practical and timely suggestions for improving communication after critical incidents such as officer-involved shootings."
A police officer-turned-attorney examines the relationship between law enforcement and the media. Read full book review >
RATIONING EARTH by Herb Bentz
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 12, 2016

"An original take on the economics of resource conservation."
A radical, ecologically minded proposal to meet the future challenges of an increasingly productive but still unsustainable economy. Read full book review >
COUNTER JIHAD by Brian Glyn Williams
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A refreshingly nonpolemical work that walks through the benumbing stages of war and response to the present Islamic State group problem."
A reasonable, step-by-step look back at the war on terror that aims to dispel misconceptions held by a younger generation. Read full book review >
AGAINST EMPATHY by Paul Bloom
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"An intriguing counterattack to modern psychological cynicism."
The potential of empathy to lead to cruelty prompts Bloom (Psychology/Yale Univ.; Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil, 2013, etc.) to promote the function of compassion, which is informed by rational deliberation. Read full book review >
WHIPLASH by Joi Ito
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"This exhilarating and authoritative book actually makes sense of our incredibly fast-paced, high-tech society. A standout among titles on technology and innovation, it will repay reading—and rereading—by leaders in all fields."
Two cybergurus offer a "user's manual to the twenty-first century." Read full book review >
UNPRECEDENTED by Thomas Lake
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"An early, vivid re-creation. Readers seeking great depth and understanding will have to look elsewhere."
CNN's photo-and-text account of the 2016 presidential election. Read full book review >
THE CHIBOK GIRLS by Helon Habila
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 5, 2016

"Both an informative primer on Nigeria's history of Islamist conflict and a passionate testimonial on behalf of the 218 Chibok girls still missing."
An empathetic inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the 2014 kidnapping of 276 girls from the Chibok Secondary School in Nigeria by the Islamist group Boko Haram. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >