Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 500)

MAFIA COP by Lou Eppolito
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1992

"NYPD buffs. (Photos—16 pages of b&w—not seen.)"
A Manhattan cop breaks family tradition—his uncles, cousin, father, and grandfather all were members of the Gambino crime family—and is accused of selling his shield after a highly decorated career. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1992

Warmhearted, charmingly offbeat memoir by the LAPD's last policewoman. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1992

"An intense and persuasive call for Israelis to confront their consciences—and for others to consider some of the spiritual questions imbedded in the politics."
An American briefly imprisoned in his adopted Israel—for refusing to serve in the army on the West Bank—ponders the moral and practical implications of Israel's increasingly violent occupation of the territories. Read full book review >
EXPERIENCE OF WAR by Robert--Ed. Cowley
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1992

"Several maps help vivify this bonanza for military-history buffs."
Bountiful anthology of articles from MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1992

"His thesis, however, is original enough to compel attention and forceful enough to provoke thought."
An even-tempered (if rather partisan) critique of the American soul as it exhibits itself on the different fronts of our ``culture war.'' Neuhaus (Unsecular America, 1986, etc.) traces the traumas of our social and political life back to their ontological roots and supplies a prognosis that will undoubtedly scandalize as many as it sways. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1992

"Occasionally diverting but mostly as grim as a sheriff's posse. (Seventy-three photos.)"
A recounting of the turn-of-the-century exploits of Bill Miner, ``one of the most wanted outlaws in North America.'' He also turns out to have been one of the least colorful. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 27, 1992

"A thoughtful, humane, and readable history that brings the reader very close to this epic battle, the three cultures involved, and what it was like for the men and women who lived—or died- -through it. (Photographs—40 b&w, one color—not seen.)"
From Feifer (Our Motherland, 1974, etc.)—a fully considered, well-told account of perhaps the greatest land-sea-air engagement ever: the 1945 battle of Okinawa. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 26, 1992

"Essential for anyone with a deaf person in his or her life, or for anyone who wishes truly to understand two million deaf fellow Americans."
Lane (Psychology/Northeastern) follows up When the Mind Hears- -his 1984 history of the deaf—with an excoriating analysis of the oppression of the deaf in contemporary society. Read full book review >
HOPE FOR THE LAND by Charles E. Little
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 20, 1992

"A lyrical and thoughtful analysis, offering compelling evidence in support of effective land stewardship based on collective action."
An impassioned advocacy of land-use planning in America as an absolute necessity, from land-preservationist Little (Greenways for America, etc.—not reviewed). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 18, 1992

"Smooth, smart, and very, very scary."
Junkies, dealers, narcs, and other combatants in the war on drugs speak out in this first-rate oral report from Wells (444 Days, 1985) and Triplett. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 18, 1992

"Not a seminal work of history, but a well-told and worthwhile look at two important incidents in the history of American government. (Eight pages of b&w photos—not seen.)"
In a pleasant if unremarkable history lesson, America's Chief Justice (The Supreme Court, 1987) recounts ``two episodes in American history'' that were ``of extraordinary importance to the American system of government''—the impeachment trials of, in 1805, US Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase and, in 1868, President Andrew Johnson. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 15, 1992

"A thoughtful, well-researched look at the current pronounced conservatism of a most enigmatic and influential institution. (Eight pages of b&w photos—not seen.)"
Los Angeles Times reporter Savage engrossingly chronicles a sea change in the nation's high court—its transformation, under Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, from guardian of an expansively interpreted Bill of Rights into a highly restrained and, toward government authority, profoundly deferential court. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >