Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 500)

STAND BEFORE YOUR GOD by Paul Watkins
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1994

"A graceful and ultimately sad account that tends to keep to the surface but, even so, makes us question assumptions about education, tradition, and the elite."
An unsentimental memoir of being an American in English boarding schools—the first nonfiction from the author of The Promise of Light (1993), etc. Watkins registers his shock as a small boy upon being left by his father at the Dragon School near Oxford. Read full book review >
A PLACE THAT'S KNOWN by Michael Pearson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1994

"But even this long ramble with a garrulous stranger has its charm."
After Imagined Places (1991), a well-honed series of essays contrasting literary landmarks such as Frost's Vermont and Hemingway's Key West with their social reality today, Pearson (English/Old Dominion) adds to his travels a personal theme—his search for his father and relationship with his son—in a medley of styles and forms. Read full book review >

NELLIE BLY by Brooke Kroeger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1994

"Inspiring reading for those searching out a feminist role model—or just a breathless ride through an incredible life. (16 pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
A meticulously researched, consistently entertaining biography of the legendary turn-of-the-century journalist whose true adventures far outstripped the boundaries of myth. Read full book review >
LIVING A POLITICAL LIFE by Madeleine Kunin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1994

"Compulsory reading for anyone, male or female, who has ever pondered the mysteries of political life. (16 pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
The triumphs and challenges of the political arena shape an extraordinarily candid, often lyrical, memoir from former Vermont governor and current Deputy US Secretary of Education Kunin. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 28, 1994

"Absorbing and sobering illumination of a dark corner of the American psyche."
Fascinating, well-researched account of how immigration and public health have influenced each other in the American experience. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 1994

The international Bank for Reconstruction & Development (aka the World Bank) turns 50 in 1994. Read full book review >
ON APPEAL by Frank M. Coffin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 28, 1994

"A valuable guide, by an insider, into our nation's most important legal institutions."
Federal appellate judge Coffin (The Ways of a Judge, 1980, etc.) takes the reader on an erudite, informative and witty tour of American appellate courts, those courts that review the legal decisions of trial courts and give litigants a second chance at justice. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 24, 1994

"A triumphant and evocative collection: journalism at its best."
A splendid collection of reports originally from the New Yorker. Read full book review >
PARALLEL TIME by Brent Staples
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 1994

"A notable debut."
A provocative coming-of-age memoir that candidly addresses questions of loyalty to family, class, and race. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 16, 1994

"A gem of a study that illuminates the debate about school choice, emphasizing the school as nurturer of children and not as political tool."
A lean, lucid discussion of the pros and cons of school choice. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 16, 1994

"Challenging and intense—for all serious students of American culture, but probably best for those with some background in the law."
A brief but profound analysis of how the Reagan-Bush right has exploited the law to victimize women, gays, and ethnic minorities. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"Porter has made a strong case with persuasiveness and historical sweep."
By Porter (Political Science/Brigham Young/Harvard), an important assessment of the critical role played by war in expanding and defining the modern state. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >