Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 500)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"A perceptive portrait of an island society and its leaders, marred only slightly by obvious generalities about the problems facing tourist-based Caribbean economies."
A hard-hitting report on the ruling family of the former British colony of Antigua. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Sutematsu and her brave companions deserve more, but this is at least a long overdue beginning. (Twenty-six b&w photographs—not seen)"
The tale of a young Japanese woman's encounter with the West during the Meiji era—as told with unfortunately little resonance by great-granddaughter Kuno. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Like an old newspaper, Dana seems faded here—distant, out of focus, with his claimed significance difficult to account for; ironically, it's Pulitzer who comes across vividly and with bite. (Eighteen illustrations—not seen)"
In the first biography of 19th-century newspaperman Charles A. Dana since Candace Stone's Dana and the Sun (1938), Steele (Rhetoric and Communications/Univ. of Virginia) cautiously depicts her subject's life from his obscure New Hampshire origins to his 30-year stint as editor of the New York Sun, then one of the most influential papers in America. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Harmless—but not particularly riveting or enlightening."
In the tradition of soft, self-congratulatory autobiographies, a young former Bush Administration media-relations director reveals the secrets of her success. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Provocative perspectives on a McLuhanesque principle—the medium is the message."
A perceptive, albeit none-too-sanguine, appreciation of the literally earth-shaking ways in which space-age communications technologies are reordering the world in the wake of the cold war- -which they helped to end. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 31, 1993

"A disappointing scrapbook seemingly designed more for the author than the reader."
An uneven—and even self-indulgent—mÇlange of autobiography and reportage from a Jewish writer with deep southern roots. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 30, 1993

"Another forgotten woman deservedly brought to our attention- -but in a work that's more a catalogue of her considerable accomplishments than a full portrait."
A workmanlike biography from Miller (History/University of the Pacific) of leading socialist and antiwar activist Kate Richards O'Hare (1876-1948), who was imprisoned for her opposition to WW I. Shaped by her childhood in rural Kansas, O'Hare went on to become one of the leaders of America's Socialist Party. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 28, 1993

"A suspenseful confrontation between a roaring inferno and an elephantine bureaucracy, in which everyone gets burned."
With one eye cocked for high drama, the other for any hint of bureaucratic bungling, Morrison (a reporter for Insight magazine) tells in fascinating detail the story of Yellowstone's 1988 firestorm. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 15, 1993

"Chickering's emphasis on the discovery of personal and site- specific answers to problems—backed by accounts of successful community projects worldwide—will inspire even many who disagree with his positions."
A carefully reasoned attempt to find common ground between liberals and conservatives, by a libertarian conservative committed to eliminating racism and poverty. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 15, 1993

"For the most part, a strident and unconvincing polemic."
The many supposed sins of Israel, as compiled by former Illinois congressman Findley (They Dare To Speak Out, 1989—not reviewed). Read full book review >
THE MORAL SENSE by James Q. Wilson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 12, 1993

"A refreshing and timely work."
A slow-paced but utterly intriguing examination of the development of the ``moral sense'' that governs human conduct in all cultures and times. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 2, 1993

"A dull narration that only occasionally flickers to life—but one that, thankfully, doesn't quite obscure Headley's real legacy: his many rightings of injustices along his courageous, committed way. (First printing of 35,000)"
Drab self-rendering of the colorful life of supersleuth Headley, champion of underdogs, who died last year of Lou Gehrig's disease. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >