Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 501)

RAJIV GANDHI AND RAMA'S KINGDOM by Ved Mehta
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Mehta's innocent faith in market forces and progress make a complicated story meaningful but also perpetuate Western anxieties about the alien, unpredictable, and menacing character of modern India. (3 illustrations, not seen)"
Essays (most originally published in the New Yorker) providing a lucid account of the chaotic course of Indian politics since 1982. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Almost certainly the best book on this subject that we are likely to see."
This account of the Cambridge Spy Ring is so knowledgeable and full of insight that it sweeps the competition from the field. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A more lively tale of early Clintonism than some of the recent overviews."
A nifty case study of the tangled trail—from policy idea to law—of the bill that established the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993, the program known as AmeriCorps. Read full book review >
BLACK JUDGES ON JUSTICE by Linn Washington
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"This is an uneven but insightful series of observations that, though generally liberal, covers the political and geographic spectrum."
Washington, executive editor of the Philadelphia Tribune, conducted these interviews of black judges with the conviction that they would have an important and unique point of view of the judicial system. ``Teach'' vies with ``justice'' for the honor of most-used word in the book. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Howard says is needed to reform our regulatory system."
Attorney Howard makes an obvious but important point by decrying a system of governmental regulations whose complexity and detail often cause more harm than good; but his solutions are vague and quixotic. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

The American ``occupation'' of Britain during WW II—the phrase is George Orwell's—could have been a disaster but, in the event, was almost a triumph. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A good read, if a bit facile. (First serial to Wired; $35,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
A fast-paced tale of teenage hackers and their potentially dangerous mischief in cyberspace. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Minor problems, and a thick theoretical vocabulary aside, Chen's thesis is fundamentally sound, supportable, and intellectually challenging."
An ambitious revisionist challenge to Edward Said's concept of Orientalism. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 28, 1994

"In the absence of a broader context, this look at the lifestyles of the well-educated and anonymous raises more questions than it answers."
Pedestrian profiles dominate this sociological study of a cohort of Stanford graduates' first ten years in the real world. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 15, 1994

"Although this is an authoritative scholarly work, it suffers from an excess of sophistication and circumspection, so that the questions readers most want answered are not addressed squarely enough."
This account of how US authorities studied the surviving victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki ought to be of wide interest, but Lindee's version of the story will not attract a general readership outside academic circles. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 7, 1994

"The volume leaves the young minster on the eve of a watershed in his own life, in the life of his people, and in the life of America as a whole: the Montgomery bus boycott."
This second of a projected 14 volumes of Martin Luther King's collected works covers the period from his postgraduate education at Boston University's School of Theology through the end of his first year as pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 7, 1994

"Whatever insights Gellner may have into specific historical circumstances are obscured by sociological jargon and abstraction."
A brutally esoteric philosophical peregrination concerning the prospects for civil society in post-Marxist Eastern and Central Europe. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >