Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 502)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

The tale has been told many times, the theories get ever more intricate, but Canute himself could not still the waves of interest in British spy Kim Philby and what author Brown (Bodyguard of Lies, 1975) calls with some justice ``the spy case of the century.'' This book's new wrinkle is that it's a dual biography of Kim and his father, the formidable H. St. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

A gritty if tasteless and overblown recounting of one honest NYPD detective's investigation of one corrupt NYPD cop. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"But this is a sensible, thoughtful, and—in revealing the foibles of many key actors—an often amusing book. (16 illustrations, not seen)"
A valuable study of how British propaganda helped to bring the US into WW II, which shows too why such a study has been so slow to appear. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Deeply disturbing and utterly convincing."
A shattering real-life Hand That Rocks the Cradle account, by veteran true-crime writer Egginton (Day of Fury, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"The range and passion of the pieces presented here shows off another one of Dissent's strengths: Not only has it adopted a dissident stance toward mainstream American politics and culture, but it has also fostered and nurtured dissent in its own pages."
Amid the ruins of the fratricidal wars that drove much of the American left into irrelevance by the end of WW II, Dissent, a highly intelligent journal of opinion, first appeared in 1954. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Costello, having done his homework and strongly made his case, is sure to provoke argument among historians and WW II buffs."
In this riveting revisionist study, British historian Costello (Ten Days to Destiny, 1991, etc.) rethinks the events leading up to the start of WW II in the Pacific. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 30, 1994

"Still, a rare glimpse behind the curtains of a terrorist act, instructive both for the light it sheds on a 46-year-old assassination and for the issues it raises relevant to today."
An intriguing examination of the circumstances surrounding the 1948 murder in Israel of UN mediator Count Folke Bernadotte. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 30, 1994

"Brilliant, accessible scholarship that perfectly complements Stephen J. Adler's recent, anecdotal The Jury (p. 893)."
An eloquent and persuasive study of how the American jury system has degenerated since colonial times and what can be done to restore it. ``Jurors are forever smarter than assumed by lawyers working from manuals,'' writes Abramson (Politics/Brandeis; The Electronic Commonwealth, 1988), and he should know; he was a prosecutor in a DA's office. Read full book review >
GENTLEMAN SPY by Peter Grose
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 28, 1994

"Grose's outstanding study of a remarkable life gives readers insight into both a period of history and the development of the CIA."
A compelling biography of a man who was present at the birth of America's foreign intelligence apparatus and went on to run the CIA under presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 22, 1994

"The answer would have been of interest to the hundreds of thousands who died on the Cold War's proxy battlefields."
Rodman swerves from objective scholarship to partisan cheerleading in this chronicle of the struggle between the US and the Soviet Union for control in the Third World. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 22, 1994

"Articulately partisan critiques of the volatile and evolving state of the union."
Another 175 pieces of Will's lively, inquiring mind. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 20, 1994

"Despite compelling material, Zuroff's sludgily bureaucratic- academic prose style manages to stifle much of this important book's impact."
The murderers are still among us, but Zuroff, coordinator of Nazi war crimes research for the Simon Wiesenthal Center, and others like him continue to hunt them; retelling the story of this quest ought to be more exciting. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >