Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 502)

THE GODSON by Willie Fopiano
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Fast action in a moral vacuum: frightening and compelling. (Photos—not seen)"
Gritty memoir by a former Boston gangster, written with the help of New York Post crime reporter Harney. Read full book review >
A HISTORY OF WARFARE by John Keegan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"While all civilizations may owe their origins—if not their existence—to war, Keegan concludes that global survival depends on our curbing humanity's vast capacity for destructive violence—and on this score, readers of his superb new survey will find, he's cautiously optimistic."
With his usual fluent mastery, Keegan (The Price of Admiralty, 1989, etc.) offers provocative perspectives on armed conflict through the ages. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Fish offers here exactly what he argues for: clarity, integrity, conviction, the common place of common sense. (First serial to Harper's and the Atlantic Monthly)"
Splendid essays by Milton scholar and literary theorist Fish (Doing What Comes Naturally, 1990, etc.; English/Duke) that express his centrist, mediating, pragmatic position in the recent cultural wars over theory, politics, and the place of literature in society. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Flawed by Levine's endless snarling and a sometime sluggish style—but undeniably the real nitty-gritty at its core. (Eight- page b&w photo insert—not seen)"
Former DEA agent Levine's account of his South American sting operation to capture major cocaine traffickers—a sting, he claims, that was sabotaged by the CIA. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Of interest primarily to civil libertarians and hard-core prison buffs; stronger glimpses of big-house life can be found in Wilbert Rideau and Ron Wikberg's Life Sentences (1992)."
Though of some interest for their insider's view of life behind bars, the ``prison writings of Red Hog''—essays that Martin, a convicted bank robber, published in the San Francisco Chronicle while in a federal pen—are most important as the fulcrum of a freedom-of-speech battle fought in and out of court by Martin and the Chronicle against the federal prison system. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Urbane and intelligent: a useful analysis of a rapidly changing phenomenon."
A timely look at nationalism, a phenomenon more often noted than analyzed, by Pfaff (Barbarian Sentiments, 1989, etc.), longtime political commentator for The New Yorker, The International Herald Tribune, and The Los Angeles Times. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A lively, thoughtful call to bridge the information gaps that make the world a more dangerous place than it need be."
Having filed dispatches from more than 150 countries in the course of a lengthy career with the AP, Rosenblum (Back Home, 1989, etc.) developed some strong opinions on the state of the news business. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Stronger as biography than as feminist cultural history—and it's too bad that this book (published in England in 1992) wasn't updated to include Britain's new female Secret Service chief at work—at her desk. (Sixteen b&w illustrations)"
While ``Mata Hari'' remains synonymous with the femme fatale trading her body for secrets, this readable biography of the original—the Dutch-born exotic dancer executed by the French in 1917 for espionage—argues that she was framed and challenges the whole notion of women agents as sex workers. Read full book review >
EXECUTION EVE by William J. Buchanan
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Photographs—not seen). (First printing of 20,000; film rights sold to Multimedia Motion Pictures)"
One of the strangest, most convoluted true-crime tales of the year, recounted with skill by Buchanan (Creative Writing/University of New Mexico), whose father figured prominently in the case. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Rambling and repetitive polemic that could have something important to say but by substituting assertion and anecdote for rigorous analysis, doesn't. (Illustrations—not seen)"
Here, Enloe (Government/Clark University) makes bold but often unsubstantiated assertions about the relationship between sexuality and militarism—as she seeks, not too persuasively, to chart changing post-cold-war sexual politics. Read full book review >
ALMA MATER by P.F. Kluge
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Rueful, tender, eloquent: an evenhanded view of the allure and penalties of academic life that should be required reading for everyone connected with a liberal-arts college."
Kluge (The Edge of Paradise, 1991) brings his personable manner, pellucid style, and sharp eye to recounting a year spent living at his alma mater of Kenyon College, juxtaposing the illusions about academic life with the reality. Read full book review >
BERIA by Amy Knight
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"In avoiding sensationalism or unbridled psychological speculation, Knight forgoes a full apprehension of the pathology of Beria and the system that bred him—without which many may choose not to endure the man's odious company. (Illustrations)"
Scrupulous academic account that ultimately fails to do full justice to the chilling fascination of its subject. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Marilu Henner
author of CHANGING NORMAL
April 26, 2016

After they’d been dating only a short while, and as they were falling in love, Marilu Henner and Michael Brown were hit with the ultimate bad news: Michael was diagnosed with cancer. Refusing traditional care, they pieced together a personal and holistic view on battling his cancer, all while forging an unbreakable bond. In this moving and informative book, Marilu pulls back the curtain on how they dealt with the blow. She relates her holistic perspective on health—including the superfoods, exercises, and immunotherapy they used to fight back—and why a diagnosis doesn’t have to be the end of romance or of a happy and fulfilling life. “An inspiring love story wrapped in a serious call for new ways to treat disease,” our reviewer writes. View video >