Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 505)

NON-FICTION
Released: July 18, 1995

"Eloquent, somber, and immensely thought-provoking. (Book-of- the-Month Club/History Book Club featured alternates)"
Noted authors Lifton (Protean Self, 1993, etc.) and Mitchell (The Campaign of the Century, 1992) ``explore what happened to America as a consequence of Hiroshimaboth the bomb's existence in the world, and our having used it.'' In a painstaking and painful psycho-historical analysis, the authors are concerned with examining the motivations of those who made the decisions, particularly Truman, and the effects of that decision on Truman and on the development of subsequent US policy. Read full book review >
FULBRIGHT by Randall Bennett Woods
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 17, 1995

"A window into US history from the genesis of the Cold War to America's withdrawal from Vietnam: crucial reading for anyone who would understand the politics of that era. (15 halftones, not seen)"
A cool, intellectual biography of the patrician southern politician who became one of America's most influential opponents of the Vietnam war. Read full book review >

OSWALD AND THE CIA by John Newman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 14, 1995

"Exhaustive, tedious, and diffuse, this study eschews sensationalism but threatens death by minutiae."
Intelligence veteran Newman (History/Univ. of Maryland; JFK and Vietnam, 1992) tackles Lee Harvey Oswald ``the file'' rather than ``the man.'' In this case ``the file'' refers to roughly 250,000 pages of documents from the CIA, FBI, DOD, Army, Navy, and the American Embassy in Moscow, recently released by the JFK Assassination Records Review Board. Read full book review >
SLEEPERS by Lorenzo Carcaterra
NON-FICTION
Released: July 10, 1995

"Carcaterra has run a moral and emotional gauntlet, and the resulting book, despite its flaws, is disturbing and hard to forget. (Film rights to Propaganda; author tour)"
An extraordinary true tale of torment, retribution, and loyalty that's irresistibly readable in spite of its intrusively melodramatic prose. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 4, 1995

"Still, an intelligent albeit unfocused foray, far richer—and much worthier of serious consideration—than the usual polemic."
Neoconservative gadfly Lind bites fiercely at right and left- -and just about every American institution in between. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 3, 1995

"Challenged and challenging, the author offers a self- portrait of a man in a wheelchair, neither hero nor poster boy, that should help to rattle stereotypes a little further. (Author tour)"
In a memoir that is both funny and furious, tales of private and public adventure from a nationally known radio and TV reporter who is paralyzed from the chest down. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 3, 1995

"The engrossing text has helpful tabular material and graphics throughout."
Taking issue with intellectual Francis Fukayama, who posits the end of history, business strategist Ohmae (The Borderless World, 1990) more plausibly prophesies the eventual demise of the nation-state, because it has become ``an unnatural, even dysfunctional, unit in terms of which to think about or organize economic activity.'' Writing with his customary brio and clarity, the Tokyo-based, MIT-educated consultant makes a persuasive case for the arresting proposition that sovereignty is increasingly irrelevant. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1995

"Novelistic suspense, strong characterization, plus state-of- the-art crime-solving add up to a natural for summer reading lists. (Author tour)"
A propulsive true-crime thriller about the first use of DNA fingerprinting to nab—and ultimately execute—an American murderer. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1995

"The authors' masterful marshalling of the evidence prompts relief that the invasion of Japan never took place, but it's unlikely to put to rest historical speculation about the morality of Truman's decision. (photos, not seen)"
This grim and painstaking analysis of plans for operations Olympic and Coronet (the invasions of Kyushu and Honshu) argues that dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki was a military necessity that hastened the end of WW II and saved possibly millions of Japanese and American lives. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1995

"An unsparing autopsy of the corpse of the First Italian Republic, with revelations that inspire both hope and despair."
A highly successful attempt to understand the bewildering, exasperating, and at times absurd political culture of contemporary Italy. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 1995

"Despite these lapses, generally engaging. (10 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
This thoughtful study weighs received wisdom about women who influence American foreign policy against the evidence. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1995

"Deft and timely, this helps dispel many misconceptions about one of our nation's least understood immigrant populations."
A masterful blend of personal, family, and national history set against the backdrop of South Korea's long fight for independence and democracy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >