Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 505)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"Powerful, though, for its two-fold message: that America must do more to educate Latinos (our fastest growing minority), and that freedom of thought belongs to everyone."
A young man's appraisal—Navarrette is only 25 now—of his turbulent years as a Mexican-American undergraduate at one of the nation's most prestigious universities. Read full book review >
OUT OF ORDER by Thomas E. Patterson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 14, 1993

"Provocative prescriptions that draw useful distinctions between good politics and good government. (Charts and tabular material—not seen)"
An arresting and perceptive critique of the media-centric process by which America selects its Presidents. Read full book review >

THE FATE OF MARXISM IN RUSSIA by Alexander Yakovlev
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 13, 1993

"A damning, eloquently made case against Marxism—but one that lacks genuine resonance for want of an accounting of its author's change of mind."
A bitterly comprehensive indictment of Marx and Marxism handed down by a sometime stalwart of the USSR establishment who, however, offers almost no insights on his own conversion from apostle to apostate. Read full book review >
DEN OF LIONS by Terry Anderson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 12, 1993

Tremendously moving account by the AP's former Chief Middle East Correspondent of his 2,454 days as a hostage of the Islamic terrorist organization Hezbollah. Read full book review >
LAND OF IDOLS by Michael Parenti
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 12, 1993

"Eloquently argued and provocative, but those seeking a solid progressive agenda for a post-cold-war America will be disappointed."
Radical social-critic Parenti (Make-Believe Media, The Sword and the Dollar, etc.) returns, isolating and condemning certain ideological underpinnings of modern American life and casting a baleful eye on everything from New Age hype to more familiar racist, sexist, and capitalist targets. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 5, 1993

"Hickok and McDowell won't convince believers in an activist judiciary, but they do make clear the dangers to democracy posed by rule by judicial decree."
A powerful and profound ``look into the nature and extent of judicial power under a written constitution of limited powers.'' Hickok (Law/Dickinson College) and McDowell (Visiting Scholar/Harvard Law School; Curbing the Courts, 1988, etc.—not reviewed) see modern federal litigation as a tool used by ideologically motivated litigants ``to supplant the status quo with new visions of the just society.'' Thus, federal courts have departed from their role as neutral arbiters of specific cases and controversies and have become ``places where abstract legal theories are pushed by this side and that.'' The authors begin by analyzing a 1989 Supreme Court case, DeShaney v. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 5, 1993

Actually, on the evidence here, Krassner—founder/editor of The Realist and the most outrageous cultural critic of his era—no longer raves now that he's in his 60s. Read full book review >
THE GANG THEY COULDN'T CATCH by Debra Weyermann
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 5, 1993

"Jaunty and smooth, like a Donald Westlake caper—except all true. (Photographs)"
Tucson newspaper reporter Weyermann tells, with humor and insightful objectivity, the story of the 1981 heist of $3.3 million from a Tucson bank depository. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Although Eisler's analyses of specific cases can be disappointingly superficial, he paints a warm, vivid portrait of Brennan the man and admirably sums up the justice's humane and progressive jurisprudence."
In this brisk, agreeable account, Washingtonian Magazine national editor Eisler (Shark Tank, 1990) pays tribute to the great liberal jurist, recapitulating the judicial achievements of Brennan's long and influential Supreme Court career. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Required reading for anyone seeking a valid perspective on America's military over the past three decades. (Eight-page photo insert—not seen)"
A well-done oral history from Santoli (Everything We Had, 1981), showing why our military was much more effective in the Persian Gulf than in Vietnam. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A top-level insider's dramatic, stranger-than-fiction disclosures in the great game of espionage. (Maps and photographs- -not seen)"
The suspenseful, eye-opening memoir of a Soviet spy who came in from the cold. Read full book review >
THE RUSH LIMBAUGH STORY by Paul D. Colford
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Eight pages of photographs—not seen)."
Lightweight bio of Rush Hudson Limbaugh III, the heartland eminence whose glib wit and rough charms have made him a heavyweight champion of tory causes. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >