Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 505)

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 28, 1994

"Absorbing and sobering illumination of a dark corner of the American psyche."
Fascinating, well-researched account of how immigration and public health have influenced each other in the American experience. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 28, 1994

The international Bank for Reconstruction & Development (aka the World Bank) turns 50 in 1994. Read full book review >

ON APPEAL by Frank M. Coffin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 28, 1994

"A valuable guide, by an insider, into our nation's most important legal institutions."
Federal appellate judge Coffin (The Ways of a Judge, 1980, etc.) takes the reader on an erudite, informative and witty tour of American appellate courts, those courts that review the legal decisions of trial courts and give litigants a second chance at justice. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 24, 1994

"A triumphant and evocative collection: journalism at its best."
A splendid collection of reports originally from the New Yorker. Read full book review >
PARALLEL TIME by Brent Staples
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 1994

"A notable debut."
A provocative coming-of-age memoir that candidly addresses questions of loyalty to family, class, and race. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 16, 1994

"A gem of a study that illuminates the debate about school choice, emphasizing the school as nurturer of children and not as political tool."
A lean, lucid discussion of the pros and cons of school choice. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 16, 1994

"Challenging and intense—for all serious students of American culture, but probably best for those with some background in the law."
A brief but profound analysis of how the Reagan-Bush right has exploited the law to victimize women, gays, and ethnic minorities. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"Porter has made a strong case with persuasiveness and historical sweep."
By Porter (Political Science/Brigham Young/Harvard), an important assessment of the critical role played by war in expanding and defining the modern state. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 9, 1994

"No simple answers here but perceptive insights intelligently presented."
A well-informed, convincing analysis of the most oppressive regimes of our century and what we can learn from them for the future, by Chirot (Political science/Northwestern; Social Change in the Modern Era, etc.—not reviewed). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 2, 1994

"In all, an authoritative and accessible survey of a life-or- death issue. (Maps; 16 pages of b&w photos—not seen)"
A grim reminder that much of the post-cold war world remains armed and dangerous. Read full book review >
THE EDGE OF NIGHT by Frank Lentricchia
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Next time, think clarity and focus."
Once called ``the Dirty Harry of contemporary literary theory,'' Lentricchia (Duke) proves something of a postmodern wimp in this annoying, enervating memoir of his life as a critic (successful) and family man (failure). Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"In brief, then, an academic's examination of a presumptive pathology, which will strike many readers as rotten to the Corps. (Photos, line drawings, and maps.)"
In a revision of his 1990 doctoral dissertation, Cameron (History/Old Dominion Univ.) attempts to anatomize the esprit of the 1st Division of the US Marine Corps on the basis of its performance during WW II and after. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Morgan Matson
July 25, 2016

From Morgan Matson, the bestselling author of Since You’ve Been Gone, comes The Unexpected Everything, a feel-good YA novel of friendship, finding yourself, and all the joys in life that happen while you’re busy making other plans. Andie has a plan. And she always sticks to her plan. Future? A top-tier medical school. Dad? Avoid him as much as possible (which isn’t that hard considering he’s a Congressman and he’s never around). Friends? Palmer, Bri, and Toby—pretty much the most awesome people on the planet, who needs anyone else? Relationships? No one’s worth more than three weeks. So it’s no surprise that Andie’s got her summer all planned out too. Until a political scandal costs Andie her summer pre-med internship, and lands both she and Dad back in the same house together for the first time in years. Suddenly she’s doing things that aren’t Andie at all. “Romance fans will find plenty to enjoy, as Andie gradually lets down her guard and risks the messy and unpredictable wonder of first love,” our reviewer writes. “A novel best read on a lazy summer day with sand between the toes.” View video >