Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 6)

AMERICAN DREAMS by Marco Rubio
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"Readers will know what's coming before they turn the first page—no better or worse than the average politico prose; as to the contents, all will depend on point of view."
Florida senator and conservative hero Rubio (An American Son, 2012) hits the hustings to proclaim a—surprise—right-wing economic platform.Read full book review >
THE AGE OF CONSEQUENCES by Courtney White
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"Though White presents no earth-shattering revelations (or solutions), readers will be engaged by his frank and thoughtful discussion of our modern environment."
A series of essays that explore some of the most pressing environmental challenges we face today and optimistically suggest some solutions. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"An informative and enlightening appraisal of the regimented tests that American schoolchildren of all ages are subjected to taking on a regular basis."
New debates about the worthiness of standardized testing in schools. Read full book review >
LORDS OF SECRECY by Scott Horton
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Big Brother is watching indeed. This useful book catches him in the act and even offers some thoughts on how to poke his eyes out."
An examination of the erosion of personal liberty accompanying the rise of the national security state. Read full book review >
EQUAL MEANS EQUAL by Jessica Neuwirth
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Neuwirth makes a good case that ratification is the right thing to do, but her matter-of-fact style won't do much to rally the troops."
A legal manifesto to revive the campaign for the Equal Rights Amendment. Read full book review >

A THEORY OF THE DRONE by Grégoire Chamayou
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Chamayou does land some good points in this rather arid exercise, but one would rather have a Camus than a Derrida on this point."
If you are what you eat, then you are also what you kill with. Q.E.D. Read full book review >
WHEN GLOBALIZATION FAILS by James Macdonald
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Sturdy, scholarly, sharply focused, closely reasoned."
The tattered history of the notion that free, international trade ensures the permanence of peace and the disappearance of war. Read full book review >
THE PATIENT WILL SEE YOU NOW by Eric Topol
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"An expertly detailed, precisely documented exploration of the 'power of information and individualization' in health care."
A visionary physician predicts a technology-driven, patient-centered revolution in health care. Read full book review >
THE FIRST AMENDMENT BUBBLE by Amy Gajda
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 5, 2015

"An eye-opening, relevant and cautionary book."
A lawyerly look at what threatens journalistic free speech liberties. Read full book review >
SEEKING LIGHT by Paul Grabhorn
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 2, 2015

"A more circumstantial text would have been welcome, but Grabhorn's photographs lend urgency to the ICRC's important missions."
A photographic record, often moving while difficult to take in, of the humanitarian crises of the last quarter-century. Read full book review >
BOOM, BUST, EXODUS by Chad Broughton
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 2, 2015

"Though somewhat academic and consistently grim, Broughton's book provides ample documentation of a central truth of late-American history—namely, that capital has no country."
You can't make an omelet without breaking eggs. As this sociological study shows, that, at least, is what they tell the eggs. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 1, 2015

"Although the prose can plod, the information and insights engage in a rousing race for the end zone."
Three academics from Marquette University, one of whom (Koonce) is a former NFL player, apply some sociological techniques to analyzing the situations of ex-NFL players. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >