Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 66)

TEACHER by Mark Edmundson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 13, 2002

"A small treasure, both Edmundson's portrait of Lears and his high-relief, visceral snapshot of Medford."
The wry and affecting story of the teacher who got under the author's skin and pointed his life in a new direction, much for the better. Read full book review >
IN LANDS NOT MY OWN by Reuben Ainsztein
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 11, 2002

"Equally appealing to Jewish scholars, military history buffs, and readers looking for a dramatic page-turner."
One man's heroic flight across war-torn Europe. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 20, 2002

"Few historical studies are as daring and engaging as this. Highly recommended for students of foreign policy, history, and global trends."
A brilliant, disquieting essay on geopolitics, warfare, and the future of the state. Read full book review >
CONFESSIONS OF A STREET ADDICT by James J. Cramer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 13, 2002

Wall Street's most notorious bull bares all in this typically over-the-top memoir. Read full book review >
THE LETTERS OF ARTURO TOSCANINI by Harvey Sachs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 28, 2002

"Music, history, and gossip from a master musician and letter-writer. (7 b&w photos)"
A rich and vivid collection of the great conductor's correspondence. Read full book review >

A SONG FLUNG UP TO HEAVEN by Maya Angelou
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 9, 2002

"Alternately elegiac, meditative, and humorous, a book to savor and remember."
The distinguished poet and playwright brings her six-volume cycle of memoirs to a close. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 4, 2002

"Wilkinson learned well from his mentor and brings that emotive, sympathetic bearing, beautiful and melancholy, with great immediacy to this homage."
A lovely tribute to novelist and New Yorker editor William Maxwell (1908-2000), who was for many years a mentor to Wilkinson (A Violent Act, 1993, etc.), as well as a neighbor, a father figure, and a friend. Read full book review >
PAPERBOY by Henry Petroski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 2, 2002

"The author concludes that 'Being an engineer is in fact a lot like being a paperboy,' and by the end, we're convinced as well that no metaphor for life is more apt than a paper route. (30 b&w photos throughout)"
An engineer (Civil Engineering and History/Duke) who has written about pencils, bridges, and other useful things casts a fond—and analytical—look back at his own 1950s youth and once again discovers mystery and magnificence in the mundane. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 25, 2002

"Fascinating through and through, if open to debate."
A sprawling, highly readable history that judges America's long struggle to defeat Communism a necessary battle badly fought from start to finish. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 15, 2002

"A well-reasoned argument for the moral necessity of halting genocide wherever it occurs, and an unpleasant reminder of our role in enabling it, however unwittingly."
The executive director of Harvard's Carr Center for Human Rights Policy presents a superb analysis of the US government's evident unwillingness to intervene in ethnic slaughter. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 5, 2002

"A supremely fascinating look at a 'serious, substantive presidency.' No journalist is better matched to this subject than Klein, and his analysis deserves the wide attention it's bound to get."
"He remains the most compelling politician of his generation, although that isn't saying very much." Read full book review >
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. by Marshall Frady
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 14, 2002

"Excellent, as are almost all of the volumes in the Penguin Lives series, and a fitting homage to a man now much honored but little studied."
An exemplary, brief life of the African-American leader who effected epochal changes in his 39 years. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >