Current Affairs Book Reviews (page 8)

THE MATH MYTH by Andrew Hacker
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"Hacker's arguments may convince some anxious students and be welcomed by their parents, but the reaction from academics is sure to be mixed."
A lively argument against the assumption that if the United States is to stay competitive in a global economy, our students require advanced training in mathematics. Read full book review >
POWERING FORWARD by Bill Ritter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"Ritter lacks the pizzazz of Sernovitz, who sees another kind of energy revolution taking place, but he presents arguments cleanly and forcefully."
An informative why-and-how book about preventing climate change by making the transition to clean energy. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"At a time when American foreign policy often seems adrift, the authors' vigorous advocacy of a renewed clear-headed engagement with allies is a bracing contribution to discussions of this ongoing conundrum."
An indictment of America's neglect of its global web of alliances. Read full book review >
EVICTED by Matthew Desmond
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"This stunning, remarkable book—a scholar's 21st-century How the Other Half Lives—demands a wide audience."
A groundbreaking work on the central role of housing in the lives of the poor. Read full book review >
THROWING ROCKS AT THE GOOGLE BUS by Douglas Rushkoff
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"A powerful exposé of an underdiscussed downside to the digital revolution."
Rushkoff (Theory and Digital Economics/CUNY, Queens; Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now, 2013, etc.) looks behind marketing hype to examine the nexus of digital technology and the economy.Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"A worthwhile contribution to our ongoing national debate about the balance between national security and privacy and about the line between sedition and dissent."
Who poses the greater threat to the United States: the spymasters and their "enormous power" or the leakers "who occasionally expose them?" Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"Timely, authoritative, and immensely depressing."
A visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution's Doha Center examines the emergence, growth, and evolution of the Syrian jihad from 2011 to 2015. Read full book review >
REDSKINS by C. Richard King
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"In the meantime, King shows why this controversy matters well beyond the football field."
This academic analysis suggests that the team name of the NFL's Washington, D.C., franchise is both reprehensible and indefensible. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"A must-read for military buffs and a should-read for anyone who has given even a cursory thought to the U.S. efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq."
The search for the story behind an IED death leads to the history of the post-9/11 wars and the lives of the men and women who fight them. Read full book review >
SELLING WAR by Steven J. Alvarez
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"A pull-no-punches critique that spares few in the defense establishment."
In his debut, a former public affairs officer reflects on the U.S. Army's failed information war in Iraq. Read full book review >
ALL THE SINGLE LADIES by Rebecca Traister
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"An easy read with lots of good anecdotes, a dose of history, and some surprising statistics, but its focus on one segment of one generation of single women is a drawback."
A feminist journalist argues that single women, who now outnumber married women in the United States, are changing society in major ways. Read full book review >
FROM SILK TO SILICON by Jeffrey E. Garten
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Of interest to students of economic history, though less intellectually compelling than David Warsh's Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations (2006) or even Robert Allen's Global Economic History: A Very Short Introduction (2011)."
Yale economic historian Garten (The Big Ten: The Big Emerging Markets and How They Will Change Our Lives, 1997, etc.) looks at 10 pioneers of the new global economy, from Genghis Khan to Deng Xiaoping.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 6, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >