Current Affairs Book Reviews

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 7, 2015

"A cautionary, timely gay rights manifesto with teeth."
The noted outspoken gay journalist and radio host passionately appeals to the gay community to resist complacency in the struggle for equality. Read full book review >
COAL WARS by Richard Martin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 14, 2015

"Martin is unequivocal and persuasive: The best use of coal is in holiday stockings."
Coal will never stop blighting our planet, writes energy analyst Martin (SuperFuel: Thorium, the Green Energy Source for the Future, 2012), and its good riddance can't come too soon.Read full book review >

BORDER ODYSSEY by Charles D. Thompson, Jr.
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 15, 2015

"A potent cri de coeur for a more compassionate, sane and humane border policy."
An exploration of 2,000 miles of fraught, rugged and deeply contested territory. Read full book review >
THE GREAT DIVIDE by Joseph E. Stiglitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 20, 2015

"Smart, sometimes-stinging prose that rejects the doctrines of strangled government and artificial austerity, doctrines that require us to 'pay a high economic price for our growing inequality and declining opportunity.'"
Nobel Prize-winning economist Stiglitz (The Price of Inequality, 2012, etc.) examines some of the macro dollars-and-cents issues that separate the haves from the have-nots—and money is just of them. Read full book review >
DREAMLAND by Sam Quinones
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 21, 2015

"A compellingly investigated, relentlessly gloomy report on the drug distribution industry."
Discouraging, unflinching dispatches from America's enduring opiate-abuse epidemic. Read full book review >

THE RELIGION OF DEMOCRACY by Amy Kittelstrom
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 21, 2015

"An intellectual history that, while scholarly and broadly allusive, extends beyond the academy walls."
A young scholar's first book finds in America's 19th-century embrace of religious liberalism the seeds of modern political liberalism. Read full book review >
SPEAK NOW by Kenji Yoshino
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 21, 2015

"Yoshino claims that he was riveted by the 3,000-page trial transcript; his cogent, incisive narrative is equally captivating."
The story of a crucial trial to legitimize same-sex marriage. Read full book review >
THE ESTABLISHMENT by Owen Jones
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 21, 2015

"An invigorating book with much fodder for thought on this side of the Atlantic."
Vigorous polemic on the makeup of England's ruling elite, with eerie parallels to the inequality in the United States. Read full book review >
THE SNOWDEN READER by David P. Fidler
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 24, 2015

"An indispensable resource for understanding the Snowden leaks."
An intense examination of whistleblower Edward Snowden that successfully wades through both partisan rhetoric and ideological constraints. Read full book review >
THE TWO-STATE DELUSION by Padraig O'Malley
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 28, 2015

"Evenhanded, diplomatic, mutually respectful and enormously useful."
A thoughtful autopsy of the failed two-state paradigm. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2015

"This valuable look at a national tragedy demands the attention of policymakers."
The overlooked plight of American-born children of undocumented immigrants. Read full book review >
UNDER THE BUS by Caroline Fredrickson
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 5, 2015

"Informative, occasionally shocking exploration of the state of women's rights in the workplace."
Examination of the inequalities women still face in the workforce. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >