COME OUT OF HER, MY PEOPLE by C.W. Steinle

COME OUT OF HER, MY PEOPLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Interpretation of the Book of Revelation, with special emphasis on the identity of Babylon.

Inspired by the events of September 11, 2001, Steinle decided to conduct an in-depth study of the New Testament Book of Revelation. He of course treads well-covered ground, and his conclusion will come as little surprise–the fall of the World Trade Center, he intones, may be the beginning sign of the fall of the Great City of Babylon as described in Revelation. Steinle’s opening chapters describe in detail the various prophesies revealed to John at Patmos, drawing in other biblical literature as well, such as from the Book of Daniel and the apocalyptic sayings of Jesus in the Gospels. The author brings up the intriguing possibility that the city of Babylon does not represent a single nation but perhaps a world government or federation, but he still believes that the United States, as a single world superpower, may be the center or beginning of such a dominating global force. He points out that two major prophecies have yet to come to fruition: global persecution of Christians and the marking of citizens in order to be able to conduct commerce. Both prophecies, he believes, are possibilities within the foreseeable future. Steinle’s approach differs from those of many other writers on this topic in a major way: He is careful not to make absolute statements or to definitively interpret this very difficult scripture. By presenting his ideas as possible interpretations only, he succeeds in maintaining credibility even with the skeptical reader. His conclusion–that Christians may want to flee the U.S. if it truly is the biblical Babylon–is intimated rather than bluntly stated. Steinle’s reading of scripture is certainly fundamental in approach, but modest enough to be a welcome read to a wide audience.

Modest, yet traditionalist, reading of Revelation.

Pub Date: Oct. 27th, 2006
ISBN: 978-1-4303-0135-6
Page count: 162pp
Program: Kirkus Indie
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