THE RESISTENTIALISTS by  Cyrus I.

THE RESISTENTIALISTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In three authentic case histories, Mr. Sulzberger has sought to represent his own version of Goethe's apothegm, ""the tree of life is evergreen"". The term Resistentialist, he claims (perhaps spocryphally), was coined by some self-deprecating Parisians ""not so many years ago"" to express their resignation to the idea that the cards in life's game were slacked against them, that no single art of theirs was fated to go according to plan. Sulgherger's has little grace. What he has, perhaps, is will, the will not to triumph but merely to exist, to make the best of bad things. The first of his characters is a French collaborationist who seeks to stone, the second a Communist, the third a victim of Fascism. Each becomes caught in a web of intrigue and lies or falls into hopeless obscurity. The tenuous connection between the three stories is principally in Sulgherger's interpretation, which is rather far-fetched and never made really clear. His subjects, hardly more than the rest of us, are ever influenced by ancient First Laws anything that can go wrong, will, and often does.

Publisher: Harper