THE ISSUES OF SURVIVAL by D. F. Fleming

THE ISSUES OF SURVIVAL

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A collection of six pieces on the cold war, the environment, the military-industrial complex, American empire, and prospects for world peace. All remarkably alike, they might have succeeded as lectures but when reprinted they become even more disappointing than Fleming's last book, America's Role in Asia (1969). Now an emeritus professor at Vanderbilt, Fleming is best known for his work as a revisionist scholar of Cold War history and there are a few sharp historical flashes here, like the reminder that the ""loss"" of Eastern Europe was the price the West paid for having appeased Hitler. But in the aggregate it's a fugal rendition of New Priorities pleas, forebodings about a final world war and the ""population explosion,"" and suggestions for a change in foreign policy. Nothing is backed up with reasoned argument: the endorsements of Nader, the view that imperialism consists in overseas investment, and the Malthusian demography are instead backed by snippets quoting everyone of good will from Edgar Snow to James Reston. The essays intone but there is no revelation.

Pub Date: March 3rd, 1972
Publisher: Doubleday