ROSS AND THE NEW YORKER by Dale Kramer
Kirkus Star

ROSS AND THE NEW YORKER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An entertaining biography -- of an entertaining subject, this does well by the man and the magazine with which he is synonymous. The roots of his character and career came from his roving newspaper days and his unorthodox editorship of World War I's Stars and Stripes his guidance of The New Yorker made it internationally famous. He is portrayed in all his eccentricities, his methods of work -- and living, in his editorial policies and crusades; he is pictured with his fellow workers throughout the years and his close association with E. B. White, Katherine Angell, James Thurber and Wolcott Gibbs; note is taken of the hostilities, alarums and excursions that made history during the magazine's quarter century existence. A provocative personality in himself, his creation is also fascinating to follow from its conception through its development as a top-ranking weekly, as a clearing house of literary and artistic talent, as a fashioner of thinking and sophistication. Here are names and names, amusing anecdotes and intermural incidents in sparkling array which should be a natural for The New Yorker's readers and not limited by only local interest. The fascination of the material carries one over some writing that perhaps falls below The New Yorker's own high level.

Pub Date: Nov. 8th, 1951
Publisher: Doubleday