LANGUAGE, PERSONS, AND BELIEF by Dallas M. High

LANGUAGE, PERSONS, AND BELIEF

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Under the conviction that there is a much greater interest in the problem of the meaning of language today than has been recognized, the author undertakes a study of the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein focusing on his posthumous writings published as the Philosophical Investigations. In these writings. Professor High finds a more positive approach by Wittgenstein to the problem of the meaning of language, counteracting the somewhat negative of destructive tendencies in his earlier work. In view of the fact that the earlier work has often been taken as the basis for constructing schemes of linguistic analysis, the present volume will do much to restore Wittgenstein to a rightful place as a seminal thinker for our day. Wittgenstein came to see a new dimension in human speaking, according to the author, whose basis lies in the personal authentication of any individual's use of words by his own attitude of belief. The first half of the book gives an exposition of Wittgenstein's teachings; the second applies these particularly to our religious use of language. The author finds the two not only compatible but enriching, especially for religious discourse. Clearly written, this could be attractive both to readers seeking an introduction to the problems of language use, and to scholars and students of more special acquaintance with the field.

Pub Date: Oct. 11th, 1967
Publisher: Oxford