BABY LOVE AND CASEY BLUE by Darby Foote

BABY LOVE AND CASEY BLUE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Somehow the children of the rural south seem to be more worldly-wise than their peers elsewhere -- viz., Mick in The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, or little Addle Pray of Paper Moon. . . or Leah Ann Blue, a.k.a. Baby Love to her charming ne'er-do-well father, Casey, who gets himself into the soup back home in the Texas panhandle town of Sedbury and, with Baby in tow, makes a quick getaway in his beloved vintage car, Sweetheart. They take a wrong turn and end up in Sister-ville, the grimmest, meanest asshole town you've ever had the good fortune to miss. In fact it's so grim and mean it's unbelievable. There's no getting away and the only means of making any money is to work for Boss pickin' ""bolls"" only to give it all as a ""Love Offering"" to the Prophet down at the Gospel Tent. Between them they have the town sewn up. Things go from bad to awful what with Sweetheart lost in a poker game and the whole town after Casey's irreverent hide. To make it worse than awful, Casey gallantly rescues little Amy Sunshine, the Prophet's handmaiden, from being stoned to death by the God-fearin' folks of Sisterville when they learn that a virgin she ain't. A tough but lovable little tramp, Amy is a perfect match for a rounder like Casey and eventually, after many more complications, they make their escape in Sweetheart like you always knew they would. All this is narrated by a grown-up Baby Love who accepts those many misadventures in the cotton patch, unsentimental and uncomplaining, like every good semi-orphaned southern urchin she has bare feet and matted hair and clear-sighted vision. And that's just as well because the story itself is all corn pone and molasses.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1975
Publisher: Putnam