FIFTY WORKS OF ENGLISH LITERATURE WE COULD DO WITHOUT by

FIFTY WORKS OF ENGLISH LITERATURE WE COULD DO WITHOUT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Don't Never Forget (1966) Brigid Brophy is one of the wittiest morticians in the business and here in collaboration with her husband and critic Osborne they have ""weeded out"" (with a machete) the academic syllabus to eliminate some of its more torporous experiences. All fall down--not only Beowulf and The Faerie Queene and Tom Jones (""a tom cat of remarkable passivity"") and Hamlet, but also Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, The Searlet Letter and the Pickwick Papers, Melville's white elephant and Lewis Carroll's Alice (""he was kinky about little girls and an extremely dull, humorless man""). Even Huck Finn and certainly Peter Pan. As for Kipling, well, ""now we've got rid of the rest of the Empire couldn't we please ditch Kipling too."" It is of course a feat of literary euthanasia, bells tolled (Hemingway) with elegies (Gray's) and Leaves of Grass fluttering to the ground. What pogrommatic destruction--what a smashing debacle.

Pub Date: Feb. 15th, 1967
Publisher: Stein & Day