MURDER IN THE FAMILY by David Delman

MURDER IN THE FAMILY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

As usual, Delman departs from conventional murder-mystery format here--as Long Island cop Jacob Horowitz (The Nice Murderers, One Man's Murder) sets off for Portugal to track down the local villains who shot his college-age son Jeremy (for no apparent reason) a couple of years back. On the plane flight over, however, Jacob meets ex-football star Ray Stickney, who's on his way to find, after a 20-year separation, his elusive, shadowy father. Almost immediately, in the split-focus narration, it becomes apparent that Jacob (soon joined by wife Helen) and Ray are on the trail of the very same man--a CIA agent called ""Concrete Charley"" Chambers. And blocking them at nearly every turn is Chambers' arch-enemy, kinky ""Eric the Red"" Halliday, US billionaire and Marxist--whose henchmen kidnap Jacob and commit other nasty violence at frequent intervals. Was Jeremy, then, caught in some espionage interplay between the CIA and the KGB? Yes indeed. But before the final showdowns and shootouts, Jacob learns that Jeremy died as a hero, not an innocent bystander. Too many chases and corpses, too many blurry supporting characters, not enough Jacob/Helen charm--but a serviceable sleuth/spy hybrid, with one or two appealing twists.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1985
Publisher: Doubleday