MEN OF POPULAR MUSIC by David Dwen

MEN OF POPULAR MUSIC

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A fine job of tracing the evolution of American popular music of the century from the sentimental ballads of the early 1900's, New Orleans ragtime, and Dixieland, to the swing of today, -- jass, blues, ballads, boogie-woogie. The careers, techniques, idiosyncrasies of representative musicians, composers and performers, and the changes and developments they wrought. King Oliver of ragtime fame; Irving Berlin; Louis Armstrong; W. C. Kandy of blues' fame; Duke Ellington, orchestrator and prolific composer; Paul Whiteman and Forde Grofs with orchestras of near symphony proportions; Gershwin; Joromo Eern and Roger and Kert of musical comedy fame; the ballads of Cole Porter; Bonny Goodman and Raymond Scott, representatives of two types of swing fame. Popular music as a growing form of American art, standing on its own merits. Discussions of techniques, harmonies, rhythm, and use of instruments. Limited in that its audience does not jibe with popular music's fans, but rather with these who have a more intellectual enthusiasm for that phase now enjoying a vogue.

Publisher: Ziff-Davis