THE STORY OF ARTURO TOSCANINI by David Ewen

THE STORY OF ARTURO TOSCANINI

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This biography of the great maestro is much more successful than the biography of Irving Berlin, since the author touches very lightly upon the maestro's personal life, which is wise in the case of a living subject, as the discrepancy between fact and fiction is often obvious and embarrassing. Here, for the music lover, is the story of a brilliant innovator and exact musician -- his early triumphs in academic works in Italy, his debut as opera conductor in 1886, his powerful readings of the new works of Leoncavallo, Puccini, and others, his tempestuous years at La Scale in Milan, premieres at the Metropolitan, work with the Philharmonic, concerts at Bayreuth, his courageous stand against fascism, and finally his post with the NBC Symphony. Through this appreciative account of his work, the reader catches glimpses of the man -- a demanding but inspiring leader with a fiery passion for searching out the core of beautiful music. An evocative and informative tribute, this book should be in every young person's music library.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1951
Publisher: Holt