THE CORPORATE OLIGARCH by David Finn

THE CORPORATE OLIGARCH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Top management receives sympathetic scrutiny from a p.r. man who has read the sociologists, concurs, and adds one startling prediction: corporation leaders may soon ""officially declare money-making subordinate to community welfare in setting the goals of their corporate power."" His thesis is that money-managing leaves a vacuum of meaninglessness in the board chairman's stomach which quickly is transposing into a desire for public service. To Finn's thinking, this is a boon, for corporations are the seat of economic power and possibly the ""central institution in American life."" The book, which is light on jargon but still heavy in style, is in effect an amalgam of enlightened insiders' experiences (names, firms, products) and impressive data culled from the economic historians. The ""socially oriented"" oligarch of the 1960's is seen in relation to legal and moral conflicts, dynastic impulses and the tabu on nepotism all in the light of increasing self-awareness. Not surprisingly, the oligarch heads The Lonely Crowd--but with a difference--he is empowered to bring on the public service millehium. For the Fortune and Wall Street Journal readership.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1969
Publisher: Simon & Schuster