TILLICH: A THEOLOGICAL PORTRAIT by David H. Hopper

TILLICH: A THEOLOGICAL PORTRAIT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mr. Hopper's work represents an attempt to offer a summation of the life and thought of Paul Johannes Tillich, and an overall assessment of Tillich's impact upon contemporary theology. The book begins with a consideration of formative influences in Tillich's youth, and then moves on into the easily recognizable stages of Tillich's career: the Barthian controversy, the ""Hirsch affair"", the shift to an ontological frame of reference, and the formulation of the definitive Systematic Theology. As a synthetic view of the subject's thought and as an integrated study of Tillich as man and thinker, this book is unique in that it sets for itself, and accomplishes, a task that has not hitherto been undertaken. As an effort to ""convey some of the excitement and fire of that thought in the process of its expression,"" however, the book falls far short of its goal; for the author's style is too leaden, and his narrative too didactic, to allow him to enkindle in the reader more than an intellectual appreciation of Tillich's accomplishment and impact. Nonetheless, as the first book of its kind on Tillich, Mr. Hopper's work should find a substantial readership--perhaps even an enthusiastic and grateful one--among theologians both professional and amateur.

Pub Date: Jan. 11th, 1967
Publisher: Lippincott