COMING HOME: How Parents and Grown Children Can Confront Each Other More Openly, Communicate More Freely, and Become Friends by

COMING HOME: How Parents and Grown Children Can Confront Each Other More Openly, Communicate More Freely, and Become Friends

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author bills himself as a psychiatrist and professional folk singer. His credo is confrontation. His method is to have each of his patients write his feelings in a letter to his parents, thus bringing problems out in the open. . . and giving Ginandes material for his book. The result is trumped-up, insufficient, and ill-advised. Ginandes' manner, which comes through much too clearly, is self-pitying. He always wanted to be an artist, he tells us. His mother objected, so he's a psychiatrist now. Whatever comment he has to make on the letter-histories is cursory (Emily's father needs help), and his patients are always getting stoned after their setbacks. It is true that parents and children have difficulty dealing with each other as adults, rather than as role-bound stereotypes. But this book doesn't meet their needs.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1976
Publisher: Delacorte