HERBERT HOOVER: AMERICAN QUAKER by David Hinshaw

HERBERT HOOVER: AMERICAN QUAKER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A eulogistic biography of a great American citizen, with special emphasis on the part played by his Quaker heritage. The biographer, especially qualified by 35 years friendship and a common religious faith, etches in lightly Herbert Hoover's orphaned boyhood, his schooling and brilliant scholastic record while working his way through Stanford, his sensational rise from a mucker in a mine to a conspicuously successful mining engineer. More emphasis and enlargement is given to his years of public service,- as head of Commission for Relief in Belgium, during World War I, his post-war work in food administration under Wilson, his post as Secretary of Commerce under Harding and Coolidge, his term as President, during the world's worst depression, his generous, unembittered continued service as adviser, private philanthropist, and, more recently, head of the Hoover Commission. The objectivity of this biography is somewhat marred by the unnecessarily defensive attitude of the author, and the bitterness he expresses toward the Democratic administration. Part of its value lies in the section devoted to a brief resume of the tenets of the Society of Friends, which make clear some of Mr. Hoover's outstanding qualities, as well as his less fortunate attributes in unbroken reserve and lack of public color....

Pub Date: April 10th, 1950
Publisher: Farrar, Straus