THE SHIP THAT WOULD NOT TRAVEL DUE WEST by David Lewis

THE SHIP THAT WOULD NOT TRAVEL DUE WEST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An English doctor tells the story of his solo transatlantic crossing in the sailboat Vtue in June of 1960. It is more than a sailing story, as these accounts usually are. In the doctor's own words, it is a story of ""endurance against the impersonal Atlantic"". On the credit side, it must be said the sailor-physician writes with clarity and grace. His story begins as he and a few other lone sailors start the transatlantic race from England. The loss of a mast, near gales, the loneliness, the scares and hard work of sailing a boat alone, are all described with great feeling. And he crosses 2000 miles of ocean only to collide with a Canadian warship, then ground off Massachusetts. His meeting with the others in New York, the long voyage back to England continue to involve the reader in this arduous odyssey. Unfortunately, the book reads like a great many others of its kind dealing with single-handed voyages. There are few surprises, although his sailing and medical-psychology data may prove valuable to some. Entertaining, but in no way unique.

Pub Date: April 26th, 1962
Publisher: St Martin's Press