THE SHEEP OF THE LAL BAGH by David Mark

THE SHEEP OF THE LAL BAGH

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Ramesh, the sheep of the Lal Bagh, is an exotic cousin of all the old horses displaced by tractors; long the delight of the hard-working people who spend Sundays and holidays in the big park in the little Indian city, he feels superfluous when a lawn mower arrives and so leaves to lose himself in a flock of sheep. On the next holiday, the people miss Ramesh--they cannot pat a machine, or rub its head, or climb on its back--so they stop coming to the park. In dismay, the mayor appoints a committee to find Ramesh, but it's a little boy who succeeds; he recognizes him because Ramesh is eating the grass in circles as he always did on solemn holidays. Granted that it's a silly sort of story, there's enormous vivacity in the Indian-inspired illustrations and neither pictures nor text take themselves seriously. You might want it just to find Ramesh neatly nibbling ""THE END"".

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1967
Publisher: Parents' Magazine Press