BLOOD, BRAINS AND BEER by David Ogilvy

BLOOD, BRAINS AND BEER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Almost fifteen years after Confessions of an Advertising Man, David Ogilvy is alive, well, retired, awfully pleased with himself, living in a French chateau, and the author of this thin, shallow, but terribly civilized memoir of his adventures before and since Madison Avenue's Ogilvy & Mather. ""I came to resent my parents' poverty, may God forgive me"" is the dominant theme of David's early English life--as a poor relation of the rich and famous, as a scholarship student at prep school and Oxford, where he's remembered as a ""boisterous, handsome, and almost idiotic great lad."" Only lasting two years there, he ""ran away from academe and became a cook at the Hotel Majestic in Paris."" Yes, just like that; likewise his rise ss top salesman of Aga cooking stoves (""the most remarkable product I have ever known""), his emigration to New York and employment by his idol, pollster George Gallup (hired by RKO to gauge audience tastes, Ogilvy created the notorious ""Box Office Poison"" list), and his British Secret Service service (""small beer"") during World War II. If Ogilvy draws no drama or warmth from these mildly engaging episodes--far better is his account of a brief attempt at settling down as a farmer among the Amish--he compensates somewhat by digressing freely on music, food, education, how-to-make-a-fortune-at-age-39, how-to-perpetuate-a-business, and, of course, advertising. Glossy, classy, and as easy to read as an Ogilvy & Mather ad--but less memorable.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1977
Publisher: Atheneum