HOW TO DO A SCIENCE PROJECT by David Webster

HOW TO DO A SCIENCE PROJECT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Though this simple start-to-finish rundown has nothing to say to advanced science fair contestants, it should prove handy to students stuck for ideas or confused as to procedure. After listing possible projects in a number of categories (among them testing advertisers' claims on paper towel strength or determining what conditions favor the rusting of iron or the growth of bread mold) Webster explains some basic practices that contribute to a scientific method, describes such steps as preliminary reading, making a plan (the title ""usually best expressed as a question"") and a schedule, doing the research and recording the results (be alert for the unexpected), and finally writing up the final report and setting up a display. One sample student project -- will a gerbil choose food or freedom -- seemed an ill chosen model as it gave no evident consideration to the timing of the gerbil's last meal, but in general this undemanding and undogmatic guide is accurately aimed toward those who need it most.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1974
Page count: 64pp
Publisher: Franklin Watts