WHERE’S PUP?

Keeping lines to four words or less but with vocabulary that will challenge emergent readers, Dodds (The Kettles Get New Clothes, 2002, etc.) sends a clown across circus grounds in search of an errant puppy. Using a bright red-orange color scheme with occasional flashes of deep blue, Pratt (No, No, Jack!, 2002, etc.) depicts the diminutive searcher questioning a succession of busy acrobats and animal tenders: “Hi there, Jess! Hi there, Bess! Where’s Pup?” “Can’t see. Go ask Lee. He’s launching Dee.” Finally the quest ends: “Can’t find Pup? Just look up”—at a page that unfolds . . . and unfolds . . . and unfolds again to reveal a human pyramid with the smiling stray at the very top. Fans of P.D. Eastman’s Are You My Mother? (1960), Eric Hill’s Where’s Spot? (1980), and a plethora of similar hide-and-seek variants will welcome this fresh addition to the genre, particularly for its crowd-pleasing climax. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: March 1, 2003

ISBN: 0-8037-2744-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2003

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Kids will dig it.

I DIG

From the I Like To Read series

A beach book for new readers.

The front-cover art shows a brown-haired boy with peachy skin and dark eyes gazing at readers while holding a shovel. He’s up to his armpits in a hole in the sand while a dog and a crab dig in the background. The back cover depicts the same boy in red-and-green swimming trunks looking at the sea beside another, bigger boy who shares his coloring but wears blue trunks. The two seem like brothers, and the older boy smiles encouragingly when the younger one says, “Look” on three successive pages as a shovel is borne into shore on the crest of a big wave. “I dig,” says the little boy on the next page, and he tunnels into the sand, finding: seashells (depicted in the art but not named in the appropriately controlled text); “a crab”; and “stars” (starfish in a watery pool that appears in the tunnel); and then “a dog,” which he follows “up” again to the beach’s sandy surface, where his brother awaits. The tunneling brings a touch of fantasy to the story, and whimsy arrives with the night’s sky and more “stars” spied by the boys—this time twinkling above. Both starry moments, as well as the energetic line that characterizes Cepeda’s technique in rendering backgrounds and figures alike, lend vitality to this simple story.

Kids will dig it. (Early reader. 4-6)

Pub Date: May 14, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-8234-3975-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: Feb. 13, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2019

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HUSH, LITTLE ALIEN

PLB 0-7868-2469-7 Kirk (Bigger, 1998, etc.) spins out an extraterrestrial version of the familiar lullaby, featuring a four-armed father promising his banana-colored little one, among other prizes, a shooting star, an astronaut (against the astronaut’s wishes, it appears), a laser rifle, tools to build a spaceship and, finally, a good-night kiss. Giving his aliens the look of hard-shelled retro toys with large liquid eyes, the author develops a silent plotline—the little alien builds the spaceship because he’s melted the old one with his new laser—as they move from a near-Earth orbit to the bottle-strewn Milky Way. It’s a bedtime journey as loving, if not quite as soporific, as the original. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-7868-0538-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Hyperion

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 1999

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