THE LETTERS OF EZRA POUND by D.D.- Ed. Paige

THE LETTERS OF EZRA POUND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A relief from some of the discursive and foggy self-revelation of many contemporary letters, this stimulating and illuminating collection of letters covering 1908 -- 1941, is essential to any study of Pound, and the poetry of which he was the apostle. From the formation of Harriet Monroe's Poetry in 1915, Pound became the self-appointed leader of the new poetry, and through his letters Pound rounded up, bullied and needled the young poets, not only to new efforts, but first of all to scholarship, a world vision and a clean-lined, sharply conceived verse. From the mighty (T.S. Eliot and Yeats) to lowly noviatiates recipients of the letters received the same treatment -- the brusque, slangly, concise messages hammered away at poetry -- world poetry was sifted and the survivors evaluated; poetry sent to Pound was analyzed line by line, word by word; and Pound's criteria were stated and restated -- say what you mean; get the subject matter on paper; see clearly; be evocative. A voice too dynamic to be ignored.

Publisher: Harcourt, Brace