DAYS OF SUNSHINE--DAYS OF RAIN by Dean Frye

DAYS OF SUNSHINE--DAYS OF RAIN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

According to a brief foreword, this has been adapted from the Play of the Weather, written early in the 16th century by John Heywood, a writer/musician at the Court of King Henry VIII. Although this is presented as a story, it is still preeminently playable with the extra advantage for the classroom--a part for everyone. Since everybody talks about the weather and no Neilson rating is as high as the early evening weather report, presumably the subject, weather, will appeal. Failing that, the sly dig at human nature will find a juvenile response. It's very simple. Jupiter, distressed at the bickerings of his Olympian staff, each of whom controlled various manifestations of the weather, finally decided to send out a special messenger to do a poll of people. Everyone encountered had a definite request; hunters wanted calm; sea captains boomed for rain; small boys asked for snow year round. Jupiter's edict satisfied everybody, godlings and earthlings alike. It was a triumph of stand-patism. He officially proclaimed, without exactly saying so, that weather would remain just as captious as always. Duvoisin's clear illustrations function as suggestions for costuming. By the same author/illustrator teams a The Lamb and the Child. (1963).

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1965
Publisher: McGraw-Hill-Whittlesey