SURVIVAL AT 40 BELOW

Focusing on the fauna that make their home in Gates of the Arctic National Park, Miller explores the many different kinds of adaptations that allow these animals to survive the brutal winters. From caribou and blackfish to Arctic fox and chickadee, most rely on physical characteristics. In preparation for winter, the wood frog literally freezes, flooding its body with glucose to prevent damage from ice crystals. The musk ox is naturally suited to the cold, with thick wool, short legs and small ears. In addition to their physical adaptations, these animals must feed and shelter themselves. The ptarmigan plunges into the powdery snow to survive nighttime temperatures, while the squirrel stores a cache of food to last the winter. The author segues nicely into spring, giving readers a sense of the full cycle of a year. Van Zyle’s acrylic artwork realistically portrays both the animals and their Arctic habitat. Predominantly blue, brown and white, the paintings evoke the harsh climate of northern Alaska. A fascinating look at the great diversity of animal adaptations, as well as an introduction to some lesser-known species. (author’s note, glossary, map, additional sources) (Informational picture book. 7-12)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-8027-9815-2

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Walker

Review Posted Online: Jan. 26, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2010

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  • Newbery Honor Book

BECAUSE OF WINN-DIXIE

A 10-year old girl learns to adjust to a strange town, makes some fascinating friends, and fills the empty space in her heart thanks to a big old stray dog in this lyrical, moving, and enchanting book by a fresh new voice. India Opal’s mama left when she was only three, and her father, “the preacher,” is absorbed in his own loss and in the work of his new ministry at the Open-Arms Baptist Church of Naomi [Florida]. Enter Winn-Dixie, a dog who “looked like a big piece of old brown carpet that had been left out in the rain.” But, this dog had a grin “so big that it made him sneeze.” And, as Opal says, “It’s hard not to immediately fall in love with a dog who has a good sense of humor.” Because of Winn-Dixie, Opal meets Miss Franny Block, an elderly lady whose papa built her a library of her own when she was just a little girl and she’s been the librarian ever since. Then, there’s nearly blind Gloria Dump, who hangs the empty bottle wreckage of her past from the mistake tree in her back yard. And, Otis, oh yes, Otis, whose music charms the gerbils, rabbits, snakes and lizards he’s let out of their cages in the pet store. Brush strokes of magical realism elevate this beyond a simple story of friendship to a well-crafted tale of community and fellowship, of sweetness, sorrow and hope. And, it’s funny, too. A real gem. (Fiction. 9-12)

Pub Date: March 1, 2000

ISBN: 0-7636-0776-2

Page Count: 182

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2000

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The three way chats, in which they are joined by other animals, about web spinning, themselves, other humans—are as often...

CHARLOTTE'S WEB

A successful juvenile by the beloved New Yorker writer portrays a farm episode with an imaginative twist that makes a poignant, humorous story of a pig, a spider and a little girl.

Young Fern Arable pleads for the life of runt piglet Wilbur and gets her father to sell him to a neighbor, Mr. Zuckerman. Daily, Fern visits the Zuckermans to sit and muse with Wilbur and with the clever pen spider Charlotte, who befriends him when he is lonely and downcast. At the news of Wilbur's forthcoming slaughter, campaigning Charlotte, to the astonishment of people for miles around, spins words in her web. "Some Pig" comes first. Then "Terrific"—then "Radiant". The last word, when Wilbur is about to win a show prize and Charlotte is about to die from building her egg sac, is "Humble". And as the wonderful Charlotte does die, the sadness is tempered by the promise of more spiders next spring.

The three way chats, in which they are joined by other animals, about web spinning, themselves, other humans—are as often informative as amusing, and the whole tenor of appealing wit and pathos will make fine entertainment for reading aloud, too.

Pub Date: Oct. 15, 1952

ISBN: 978-0-06-026385-0

Page Count: 192

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Sept. 14, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1952

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