A haunting but inspiriting remembrance.

THE EVANGELICAL’S DAUGHTER

LOSING MY RELIGION AND FINDING I AM

In this debut personal memoir, a woman recounts her youthful struggles with religious extremism.  

Torres-Reyes writes that she was raised in a fiercely religious household in which both her parents were devout Pentecostal fundamentalists. She depicts her late mother, a preacher by day and a nurse by night, as a deeply troubled woman who was capable of extraordinary cruelty, which she justified with her ideas of biblical purity. Torres-Reyes says that she was taught by her parents to be ashamed of her own body, and that the essence of spiritual duty was fear and self-loathing: “Instead of serving the Lord with gladness, we were to God served with guilt and fear.” Her home life was plagued with instability: bills went chronically unpaid, followed by evictions, and her father, she says, ended up marrying three different wives. Then the author’s mother suddenly moved the family to Iowa, making her father, back in Newark, New Jersey, an absentee parent. Torres-Reyes later suffered from anxiety, expressed through panic attacks. At 19, she gave birth to a child, and she eventually put her life in order by enlisting in the Navy, going to college, and becoming a successful attorney. Throughout this memoir, Torres-Reyes affectingly expresses her youthful torment. She soberly distinguishes between healthy spirituality and what she sees as the betrayal of God by sectarian religious fervor. Her prose is clear and unflinching throughout, such as when she calls the father of her child “a Kmart- blue-light-special, drug-dealing, no-dog-catching- dogcatcher pimp.” Her story is challengingly long and highly detailed, but many readers will be inspired by her candor and her ultimate triumph in finding a connection with God, despite attempts by others to instill her with hate and guilt.

A haunting but inspiriting remembrance.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: iUniverse

Review Posted Online: Feb. 24, 2017

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HOW TO BE AN ANTIRACIST

Title notwithstanding, this latest from the National Book Award–winning author is no guidebook to getting woke.

In fact, the word “woke” appears nowhere within its pages. Rather, it is a combination memoir and extension of Atlantic columnist Kendi’s towering Stamped From the Beginning (2016) that leads readers through a taxonomy of racist thought to anti-racist action. Never wavering from the thesis introduced in his previous book, that “racism is a powerful collection of racist policies that lead to racial inequity and are substantiated by racist ideas,” the author posits a seemingly simple binary: “Antiracism is a powerful collection of antiracist policies that lead to racial equity and are substantiated by antiracist ideas.” The author, founding director of American University’s Antiracist Research and Policy Center, chronicles how he grew from a childhood steeped in black liberation Christianity to his doctoral studies, identifying and dispelling the layers of racist thought under which he had operated. “Internalized racism,” he writes, “is the real Black on Black Crime.” Kendi methodically examines racism through numerous lenses: power, biology, ethnicity, body, culture, and so forth, all the way to the intersectional constructs of gender racism and queer racism (the only section of the book that feels rushed). Each chapter examines one facet of racism, the authorial camera alternately zooming in on an episode from Kendi’s life that exemplifies it—e.g., as a teen, he wore light-colored contact lenses, wanting “to be Black but…not…to look Black”—and then panning to the history that informs it (the antebellum hierarchy that valued light skin over dark). The author then reframes those received ideas with inexorable logic: “Either racist policy or Black inferiority explains why White people are wealthier, healthier, and more powerful than Black people today.” If Kendi is justifiably hard on America, he’s just as hard on himself. When he began college, “anti-Black racist ideas covered my freshman eyes like my orange contacts.” This unsparing honesty helps readers, both white and people of color, navigate this difficult intellectual territory.

Not an easy read but an essential one.

Pub Date: Aug. 13, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-525-50928-8

Page Count: 320

Publisher: One World/Random House

Review Posted Online: April 28, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2019

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Striking research showing the immense complexity of ordinary thought and revealing the identities of the gatekeepers in our...

THINKING, FAST AND SLOW

A psychologist and Nobel Prize winner summarizes and synthesizes the recent decades of research on intuition and systematic thinking.

The author of several scholarly texts, Kahneman (Emeritus Psychology and Public Affairs/Princeton Univ.) now offers general readers not just the findings of psychological research but also a better understanding of how research questions arise and how scholars systematically frame and answer them. He begins with the distinction between System 1 and System 2 mental operations, the former referring to quick, automatic thought, the latter to more effortful, overt thinking. We rely heavily, writes, on System 1, resorting to the higher-energy System 2 only when we need or want to. Kahneman continually refers to System 2 as “lazy”: We don’t want to think rigorously about something. The author then explores the nuances of our two-system minds, showing how they perform in various situations. Psychological experiments have repeatedly revealed that our intuitions are generally wrong, that our assessments are based on biases and that our System 1 hates doubt and despises ambiguity. Kahneman largely avoids jargon; when he does use some (“heuristics,” for example), he argues that such terms really ought to join our everyday vocabulary. He reviews many fundamental concepts in psychology and statistics (regression to the mean, the narrative fallacy, the optimistic bias), showing how they relate to his overall concerns about how we think and why we make the decisions that we do. Some of the later chapters (dealing with risk-taking and statistics and probabilities) are denser than others (some readers may resent such demands on System 2!), but the passages that deal with the economic and political implications of the research are gripping.

Striking research showing the immense complexity of ordinary thought and revealing the identities of the gatekeepers in our minds.

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-0-374-27563-1

Page Count: 512

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: Sept. 4, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2011

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