ANDREW JACKSON AND THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS by Dee Brown

ANDREW JACKSON AND THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Stilted and unconvincing dialogue (""reconstructed from historical reports of the period"") turns Andrew Jackson's southern campaign into swashbuckling melodrama. The characters are correspondingly one-dimensional (Lafitte is portrayed as a dashing Robin Hood type and the irascible Jackson is downright churlish), and the lengthy reconstructions of skirmishes and councils of war will be enough to deter all but the most dedicated strategists. A less cumbersome account of the battle can be found in Robert Tallant's Pirate Lafitte and the Battle of New Orleans (1951), and ""Old Hickory"" emerges a little further from his shell in Clara Ingram Judson's Andrew Jackson (1954).

Pub Date: Jan. 1st, 1971
Publisher: Putnam