WAR CHANT by Dee Dunsing

WAR CHANT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

1835, the year of Gaines' and Scott's campaigns in the Florida Seminole wars is highlighted by the adventures of a white boy, Rod Wheeler, in a book that, like the author's Swamp Shadows, (1948) treats of the injustices of the fruitless struggle. From his home near Tampa, Rod, joints the army as a scout. Though he is loyal to his side, his friendships with Sakochee, a Seminole, and with his intelligent companion at arms John Fox who sees both sides of the question, make Rod a focal point of shifting loyalties in a struggle government forethought could have done much to alleviate. Rod helps the Indians get rid of the slaver Ruther- an ironic move in that they depended on Ruther's arms for help and his story ends as it must, on a note of hopelessness. There is only his home-coming and the small kernel of amity he has nurtured in a situation that has long been a national sore spot. Serious and enlightened.

Pub Date: Sept. 15th, 1954
Publisher: Longmans, Green