THE EVOLUTION OF A PSYCHIATRIST: Memoirs of a Woman Doctor by

THE EVOLUTION OF A PSYCHIATRIST: Memoirs of a Woman Doctor

By
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KIRKUS REVIEW

An autobiographical account of what it was like by a woman who entered medical school in her late 20s just before WW II. Few females aspired to a career in medicine then and she describes her trials and tribulations, as well as joys, with clarity and skill. Parker came from a wealthy family and had interesting, if eccentric, forebears. However. she was the only truly functional child among her siblings. One brother drank and ended a suicide, while a sister was locked in a bad marriage. Her mother and father lived apart for extended periods, supposedly because of his work, but more because of his obsession with fighting for his rights. This mania eventually had its economic effect, but even in the bad days, the author's maternal grandparents were wealthy enough to guarantee a decent lifestyle. Though they lived in other places, New York had the most profound effect on her, and it was at Columbia Medical School that she began what was to be a successful career. She has an excellent memory and is a good storyteller, but it is her sensitive understanding of people's frailities, eccentricities and sorrows that makes this book live. The story of a proper lady who broke the mold. Those who want to learn what a pioneer went through, and bow she felt. will enjoy this memoir.

Pub Date: June 1st, 1987
Publisher: Yale Univ. Press