THE SELECTED LETTERS OF D.H. LAWRENCE by Diana-Ed. Trilling

THE SELECTED LETTERS OF D.H. LAWRENCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Tenth in the Great Letters Series is a sensitive selection-predominantly from the bulk of the correspondence which Huxley edited in 1932- but also from later sources. Intimate, spontaneous, immediate, Lawrence's letters are a highly revealing correspondence- of the man, his instinctual responses, his unequivocal beliefs, his advocacy of ""the blood, the flesh rather than the intellect"". The pattern of his life is shaped by the content of the letters; his worship of his mother and the father he was ""born hating""; the marriage to Frieda and his occasional revolt against her domination; his books and their reception; his increasing ill health- and low spirits- as the last years take them to Europe, Australia, New Mexico. The many friends with whom he corresponded provide an additional interest; he argues with Bertrand Russell; is grateful to Amy Lowell; asks advice- in the early years- from his mentor, Edward Garnett; is devastatingly candid with Mabel Dodge Luhan; and the Murrys, the Huxleys, Edward Marsh and Lady Cynthia Asquith are constants of a long association. . . . There should be a new if defined audience for this correlation of Lawrence's letters which retain their vitality.

Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Cudahy