THE CAREY STREET CAT by Diana Hendry

THE CAREY STREET CAT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Jenkins, a cat, gets along happily on Carey Street once Harry has pointed out to the neighbors who object to Jenkins's wandering from house to house that the cat's life is not so different from Harry's: he splits the week between his divorced parents. But when Jenkins captures a bit of a star (not a whole one, just ""a little-bit-of-Dazzle""), the people are affronted--Dazzle is too bright, too scary, and certainly unprecedented. Harry's mom sums it up: ""That cat is just like your father. He's after the impossible."" Outrage soon gives way to media furor and fame, during which everyone forgets to feed the poor cat. But Harry's dad, an artist, understands that Jenkins's magic is real--he just ""got a bit carried away."" Together, he and Harry find a unique way to set things right by saving the cat from his extraordinary find, knowing that next time Jenkins will be careful not to jump so high. This satirical fable is told with good humor, in language simple enough for younger children to enjoy aloud or read for themselves; Wickstrom's frequent b&w illustrations nicely reflect the mellow, comical tone. This team's The Rainbow Watchers, published simultaneously in the same format, also considers fitting in and the meaning of art, but the storyline is not as strong.

Pub Date: Oct. 16th, 1991
Page count: 48pp
Publisher: "Lothrop, Lee & Shepard"