THE UNITED STATES IN THE MEXICAN WAR by Don Lawson

THE UNITED STATES IN THE MEXICAN WAR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

It's easiest to describe Lawson's pared-down history in terms of what he omits: both the rich domestic political context and social and popular history which inform Meltzer's Bound for the Rio Grande (1974) and the speculation about the war's dubious beginnings and criticism of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which one finds in studies written from the Mexican-American viewpoint. Lawson does bring out the diplomatic blunders and distrust in Washington for field officers that helped make ""Polk's war"" so unpopular but it's battlefield action--particularly the capture of Santa Anna's wooden leg--and the comparison between Winfield Scott and MacArthur that make an impression. A basically conservative interpretation with little thematic reach, but the economical, unfussy summary will serve its purpose.

Pub Date: Dec. 1st, 1976
Publisher: T. Y. Crowell